Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: stress fracture

Julia Hawkins was 101 when she set a world record for the 100 meter dash, only a year after she started running. And she's not alone. Each year hundreds of men and women are taking to running later in life. And many of them are competing in marathons. Over half of the people competing in the New York Marathon are over 40. And their running times are getting better.

As a Seattle podiatrist who sees many patients with Type II diabetes I'm thrilled to see so much enthusiasm for exercise in older adults.

Running can help you prevent and manage many chronic illnesses, make you sharper, and give you a greater sense of wellbeing. Although running isn't for everyone and you should certainly see your doctor before giving it a try, it can be a tremendous way to live well into your later years.

Runners over 50 suffer from the same kind of foot problems as younger people including plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and ankle sprains. One difference is older adults take longer to recover from these injuries than their younger counterparts.

Recommendations for older runners include:

  • Supplement running with strength and flexibility exercises. Check out the book by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's workout coach for some exercises you can do in the gym or at home.

  • Always warm-up before your run. Although warm-ups are important for all runners, they are a must for older runners. I recommend dynamic warm-ups for runners.

  • Purchase appropriate running shoes. Check out my previous blog "How to Buy the Best Running Shoes".

  • Buy running shoes with more cushioning if you've lost fat from the pads of your feet, a common problem as we age.

  • Wear inserts or get custom orthotics made by a podiatrist particularly if you have flat feet or another biomechanical problem.

  • Eating an anti-inflammatory diet may help with age-related arthritis pain in the feet, knees, and hips.

  • Take Vitamin D and eat calcium rich foods to prevent stress fractures. As we age we lose bone mass and are more prone to bone-related health problems.

More information:
5 Tips to Keep Runner's Feet Healthy and Strong
7 Hacks to Prevent Toenail Fungus in Runners
Don't Let Heel Pain Ruin Your Morning Run

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners". In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
January 10, 2018
Category: foot conditions
Tags: stress fracture  

You may have heard about stress fractures and thought you weren't at risk because you don't have osteoporosis. Although it's true that osteoporosis can increase your risk of stress fractures there are many other risk factors you should know about.

Why is this important?

Learning about how to prevent a condition is better than having to deal with the pain and recovery time. If you do get a stress fracture, be sure to get it treated early to shorten your time away from the things you love.

Risk factors:

  • Flat feet or high, rigid arches - talk to your podiatrist about getting better support for your feet.

  • Bunions, tendonitis, and blisters - these foot conditions can affect the way your foot hits the ground.

  • Increasing your running time too quickly - you've decided to up your miles when training this year. Instead of doing so gradually (10%-20% is the guideline) you increase it by 30% or more instead.

  • Wearing worn out shoes - shoes that are worn out are not supportive. Learn more about how to buy supportive shoes by viewing this video.

  • Running on pavement vs. running on an indoor track - our bones can be affected by a small change in the type of surface we run on.

  • A job change - you go from a job where you're sitting all day to one where you're on your feet most of the time.

  • Low levels of Vitamin D - a particular problem in the Seattle area and Pacific Northwest due to our lack of sun.

  • Underweight female runners - women who have a BMI of less than 19 are more likely to develop stress fractures.

What to watch out for:

  • Pain that comes on quickly during activity and is relieved by rest

  • Pain on the top of the foot or ankle

  • Swelling

  • Redness

  • Bruising

If you're experiencing pain in the top of your foot or your ankle and you're having the symptoms describe above, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
August 21, 2015
Category: sports injuries
Tags: orthotics   runners   stress fracture  

young woman runningRunning is a huge part of how you stay fit. You love participating in races with your friends. But lately you've been dogged by horrible pain in your shins every time you run.

Can this be shin splints?

Probably. The great majority of pain below the knee--which can affect the front and the side of your leg-- is shin splints.

What Causes Shin Splints in Runners?

  • Beginning or seasoned runners who increase their training too rapidly.

  • Imperfect foot structure - if you have flat feet or your foot excessively pronates when you run you're more likely to get shin splints.

  • Improper stretching

  • Poor footwear

Can I Treat Shin Splints At Home?

  • Once you've developed shin splints, you'll need to stop running so you can heal.

  • Use ice to bring down the inflammation

  • Ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatories can also help reduce the pain.

Do I Have to See A Doctor?
Yes. Shin splints can be tricky.

  • If you have shin splints due to your foot mechanics, your podiatrist will likely recommend an insert or prescriptive orthotics.

  • Shin splints may also be a sign of a stress fracture or other condition that needs to be addressed right away.

How Can I Prevent Shin Splints?

  • Build up your training gradually; increase the time you spend running and your distance by only 10% a week.
  • Instead of just doing the typical static calf stretches, incorporate dynamic warm-up exercises. These exercises will do two things:  warm the body’s muscles and soft tissues for optimum performance and reduce the risk of injury from overloading inadequately prepared muscles.

If you're a runner with shin splints, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Rumer Willis, daughter of Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, seems to have it all together these days, except for a pesky stress fracture. She got that fracture while being part of Dancing with the Stars Perfect 10 Tour and thereby delaying her debut as Roxie Hart the murderess in "Chicago".

So what is a stress fracture and how do you get it?

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline cracks in the bone that if ignored can lead to an actual break. Most often found in dancers and other athletes that push themselves too hard and too quickly, the repetitive force is often too much for the bones to bear leading to a stress fracture.  

Women are at higher risk

You don't need to be a Broadway star, dancer, or athlete to end up with a stress fracture. Older women who are post-menopausal and younger women who are bulimic often suffer from bone loss increasing the chance of stress fractures.

Symptoms

Symptoms most often show up as pain, swelling, or redness. Don't ignor these symptoms particularly if you notice them worsening.

It's important to see your Seattle podiatrist as soon as possible so you can begin treatment and prevent a stress fracture from turning into an actual bone break.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+