Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: sports injuries

After all the turkey is gone and with Christmas and New Year's approaching, as a Northwesterner you look forward to hiking, skiing, or long walks. Not only are these activities invigorating in the cold, crisp air they will keep your weight in check. Getting more exercise is also a great way to maintain your health especially if you suffer from diabetes or are at risk for heart disease or stroke. (Of course it's always important to check with your doctor before taking on a new activity).

If you plan on hitting the trails this fall and winter it's always a good idea to take specific precautions so that your feet and ankles don't take on the brunt of your exuberance.

Go Slowly With New Activities

Our bodies are not machines. We need to take on new exercises at a slower pace than we might imagine. Take on a realistic distance and elevation gain if you're just starting out. For example, if your friends are trying to talk you into a five mile roundtrip hike; as a beginner you'll be at must greater risk for injury and pain.

Get Your Feet and Ankles in Shape

Just like the rest of your body, your feet and ankles are going to need some warming up and strengthening before they'll feel good taking on a new activity. We found this great blog written by the folks at Livestrong called "12 Anytime Moves to Strengthen Your Feet and Ankles" that will go a long way to get you in shape and avoid injuries.

Buy the Right Shoes

Shoe companies make different types of shoes for specific types of activities. Be sure you go to the experts (a running store like Super Jock 'N Jill if you're planning to run or a store like REI if you're planning to hike or ski). Bring in your current shoes or boots so the salesperson can check for wear patterns and don't forget your orthotics. The boots should feel comfortable from the start or move on. New boots and shoes can also help prevent slipping and sliding when you're on uneven terrain.

If you have a foot or ankle injury, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Download our new book "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners"  

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
November 18, 2015
Category: Heel pain

Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning may need to keep off his feet for several months in order to heal his torn plantar fascia. It's really too bad. He probably could have avoided this scenario by putting his feet up to begin with and following specific measures to heal his plantar fasciitis. But as the quarterback of his team that was probably never going to happen.

As a Seattle podiatrist, my advice is if you already have an injury or foot condition; don't tempt fate by continuing to play on it. The risk of an injury that will take you out is great.

So who's likely to get a potentially career ending injury like Peytons?

Certain Foot Types

Interestingly Peyton's brother Eli has also suffered from heel pain. Although heel pain per se is not known to run in families, foot types do. It's very likely that both Eli and Peyton have excessive pronation due to faulty foot structure, like a flat foot. A high arched foot can also place you at higher risk for plantar fasciitis.

Tight Calf Muscles

Tight calf muscles or equinus can also contribute to the development of plantar fasciitis. A tight calf muscle limits the ability to move forward at the ankle. When this happens something has to give--that something is the plantar fascia. If you're got tight calf muscles and you overstress that part of your body by running or playing football you're at greater risk for heel pain

Older weekend warriors

Older runners and athletes are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis than their younger counterparts. And if you're just playing on the weekend, that risk goes up even higher. Age was also likely a factor for Peyton. For a football player 39 is old. Although he might have gotten away with heel pain in his 20s, his older body just couldn't bounce back the way it once could.

More information about heel pain and other sports injuries:

Can A Simple Exercise Really Help Remedy Plantar Fasciitis?
Do Your Feet Feel Like Your Walking on Razor Blades?
Painful Foot Conditions in Women Runners

So if you're a runner or athlete and have foot pain or heel pain, stop running on it and come and see me.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain!" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Nothing can keep Richard Sherman down; even an ankle sprain in the 4thquarter of what will go down in history as one of the greatest Superbowl games ever. Our Seattle Seahawks played seamlessly last night. Across city, state, and country the 12thman was ecstatic as the touchdowns kept coming. Lucky for us Sherman has a long time to heal before he is back in the saddle again and thankfully all of our other players came out of this victory unscathed.

Although most of us aren’t going to get pounded by a beafy linebacker, ankle sprains are very common particularly for runners and other athletes. According to the American College of Sports medicine, 25,000 ankle sprains occur daily in the U.S. and more than 80 percent of them are a result of inversion, or inward rolling, of the ankle with poor balance being one of the causes. That should give any of us pause when we start a new sport or we know our ankles may not been in the best shape.

Depending on the type and severity of the pain our Seattle podiatrists treat using a combination of the following:

  • R.I.C.E. – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation to reduce swelling and pain
  • Immobilization with a walking boot and crutches if needed
  • Use of anti-inflammatories

I also recommend mild bracing and/or wearing foot gear that come above the ankle during the healing process. Physical therapy is also tremendously helpful if a sprain doesn’t heal within 6 weeks and to improve balance for future forays.

Caution: if you sprain your ankle and it turns black and blue get immediate attention.

Otherwise, call us at the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City at 206-368-7000 so we can assist you in beginning the healing process.