Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: ankle sprains

By Dr. Rion Berg
September 20, 2017
Category: sports injuries

As football season gets underway, "he's got a sore ankle....but nothing's broken", will be a common refrain by coaches throughout the land. Our beloved Pete Carroll used a similar phrase to talk about a couple of Seahawk's players this past week.

You may have a young football or soccer player beginning to play as they've returned to middle school and high school. If you do, you should know that a sore ankle could easily be a sprained ankle. It might not sound like such a big deal, but believe it or not sometimes a broken ankle can heal more quickly than a sprain.

But often it's really hard to tell what's going on with an ankle injury until you bring your kid in and our Seattle podiatrist has a chance to evaluate it.

In the meantime, just after the injury it's best to use the RICE protocol to keep down the inflammation and pain. I'm sure even the Seahawks use this technique once they get their player off the field until their team doctor gets a chance to look at it. Here's how to do it.

R= Put them on the couch and let them watch their favorite shows.

I = Ice the affected area 20 min on and 20 min off for the first 48 hours.

C = Use compression by applying an elastic bandage

E= Ensure that the affected ankle is elevated higher than the heart

Once your kid gets to our office, we'll do an X-ray and send them for an MRI if necessary. If your child gets repeated sprains it could result in chronic lateral ankle pain.

For more information about how to prevent injuries from occurring in the first place visit Calling All Soccer Moms for an exhaustive list.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
April 13, 2015
Category: sports injuries
Tags: ankle sprains   ankle breaks  

As a Seattle podiatrist, I'm like most of you. I love the fact that I can be active all year round due to the mild weather in the Pacific Northwest. As a father and grandfather I've always been vigilant about the types of shoes my kids wear, particularly when they're playing sports. Although my kids are grown now I still recall being concerned about foot and ankles injuries when they were playing.

I'm not alone. A 2014 ESPN poll showed that 88% of parents have concerns about their children's risk of injury while playing sports.

One area that I always hype on is the importance of purchasing the right shoe for the particular activity your kid engages in. Ensuring your kid has the right shoe goes a long way in preventing the most common type of youth sports injury, ankle sprains and breaks.

Whether your kid is involved in running, soccer, or baseball athletic shoe companies design shoes to be supportive and minimize injuries for each individual sport. This can be a big relief to you as a parent because much of the guesswork of which shoe to buy is removed. For example, basketball shoes provide more ankle support because of side to side and twisting movements that are a signature of that sport. Baseball players on the other hand need plenty of arch support; sometimes additional support with orthotics may be needed, depending on your kid's foot type.

Some Additional Shoe Shopping Tips:

  • Avoid hand me down shoes and shoes with significant wear to reduce sports injuries in your child.

  • Get your child's feet measured every time you buy a new pair of shoes to avoid cramping their toes.

  • Replace shoes after every 500 miles. Normally this takes about a year, however, if your child is particularly active they may require replacement more often.

If your child does sustain an injury, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online Keep in mind--just because they can walk, doesn't mean they don't have a fracture.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Now that the Zags beat Iowa and are in the Sweet Sixteen we can all collective breathe a sigh of relief. Not that we ever doubted they would make it, but you just never know. March Madness can remind us that basketball players get injured all the time. As a Seattle podiatrist I'd like to discuss some of the most common foot and ankle injuries that basketball players suffer. You're even more at risk if you're older and occasionally participate in a pick-up game.

Common foot injuries are ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, sesamoiditis, and blisters, Here are some things you can do to reduce your risk of injury.

Shoes

  • Test your shoes for stability (video)

  • Purchase shoes after every 500 miles of use - worn out shoes cannot provide the same level of stability.

  • Get your feet measured-as adults our feet often get bigger as we age, so in addition to having your kids foot measured you should get your feet measured as well.

  • Buy the right shoe for the activity - high tops have been the shoe of choice for many years in pro leagues, but more recently basketball trainers are advocating a lower cut shoe that strengthens the ankle, forcing the muscle to stabilize the joint. Taping your ankles can also help with stability.

Warm up

  • Weekend warriors are much more likely to get injured because they don't keep their bodies strong and flexible.

  • Be sure to warm up before you start hitting the court. Jogging in place and doing some calf stretches will help.

Strengthen and support your ankles

  • Stand on one foot and rotate your ankle 10 times in one direction and 10 in the other. Switch.

  • Standing toes raises - keep heels on the floor and lift toes 10 times.

  • Improve ankle strength by standing on one foot and then the other for a period of time.

So what if you've followed my recommendations and you still have pain? Call my front office at 206-368-7000 or request an appointment online.

New runners as well as seasoned runners are more at risk for acquiring certain foot and ankle problems. These include heel pain or plantar fasciitis, neuromas, Achilles tendonitis, and ankle sprains. More detail about these types of problems and what to do about them can be found in my blog Common Foot Problems in New Runners. However, if you want to decrease your chances of visiting me, your Seattle podiatrist, here are some tips for preventing foot and ankle problems if you’re a new runner.

Buy New Running Shoes
Schedule a professional fitting at a store that really knows about running. Super Jock and Jill in the Greenlake area is an excellent choice. Whatever store you choose make sure that they measure your feet, watch you walk, and even watch you run to assess the best shoe for you. Old worn out shoes will not provide the support and stability you need to prevent foot and ankle injuries.

Start Slowly
Even if your best friend is pushing you to run your first race in 3 weeks, it’s much more important for you to train and be really ready before taking on your first challenge. You’re much more apt to injure yourself if you’re body and feet aren’t ready. Keep in mind your current fitness level and talk to your physician before beginning any new training program. Runner’s World suggests running three days per week to give your body time to recover in between runs. In addition they recommend increasing your training time between 10-20% each week. More information for new runners can be found in The Starting Line.

Stretching
Warm up your legs by jogging in place for at least 10 minutes before you stretch. Engage in a variety of stretches to your routine. Try using Dynamic Warm-up and Cool Down exercises to get yourself ready to run.

Eat Well and Keep Hydrated
Avoid the junk and eat a diet containing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats. Limit your sugar intake and keep yourself well hydrated.

For more information about starting a new running program or treating an existing foot or ankle condition the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City can be reached at 206-368-7000 or you may request an appointment online

Nothing can keep Richard Sherman down; even an ankle sprain in the 4thquarter of what will go down in history as one of the greatest Superbowl games ever. Our Seattle Seahawks played seamlessly last night. Across city, state, and country the 12thman was ecstatic as the touchdowns kept coming. Lucky for us Sherman has a long time to heal before he is back in the saddle again and thankfully all of our other players came out of this victory unscathed.

Although most of us aren’t going to get pounded by a beafy linebacker, ankle sprains are very common particularly for runners and other athletes. According to the American College of Sports medicine, 25,000 ankle sprains occur daily in the U.S. and more than 80 percent of them are a result of inversion, or inward rolling, of the ankle with poor balance being one of the causes. That should give any of us pause when we start a new sport or we know our ankles may not been in the best shape.

Depending on the type and severity of the pain our Seattle podiatrists treat using a combination of the following:

  • R.I.C.E. – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation to reduce swelling and pain
  • Immobilization with a walking boot and crutches if needed
  • Use of anti-inflammatories

I also recommend mild bracing and/or wearing foot gear that come above the ankle during the healing process. Physical therapy is also tremendously helpful if a sprain doesn’t heal within 6 weeks and to improve balance for future forays.

Caution: if you sprain your ankle and it turns black and blue get immediate attention.

Otherwise, call us at the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City at 206-368-7000 so we can assist you in beginning the healing process.