Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: achilles tendonitis

As summer approaches we'd all like to make sure our feet will take us where we want to go and allow us to fully participate in the sports activities we love. Unfortunately some of us are more prone to developing certain types of foot problems, such as Achilles tendonitis.

What is Achilles tendonitis?

The Achilles tendon located in the back of your ankle is the largest and strongest tendons in the body; it can withstand up to 1,000 pounds of force. When this structure, also known as the heel cord, becomes inflamed Achilles tendonitis develops. If you ignore this pain, it can rupture which will require surgical intervention.

What Are the Risk Factors?

Many factors can lead to Achilles tendonitis:

  • Faulty foot structure such as flat feet

  • Equinus or tight calf muscles

  • Overuse mainly through physical activity

What You Can Do To Prevent Achilles Tendonitis

Fortunately there's a lot you can do to prevent Achilles tendonitis. Some of these fixes are mechanical in nature. For example, if you have flat feet getting fit with custom orthotics will prevent your feet from pronating, which can cause undo pulling on your Achilles. In addition, if you have tight calf muscles you can use special stretching techniques to alleviate this problem.

All the other prevention techniques are related to how you exercise.

Purchase Shoes Made for Your Sport
Buying supportive shoes is essential and wearing shoes that are designed specifically for your sport is a must. Be sure to go to a store where employees are trained to fit shoes to different types of feet. Shoes should also be replaced every 500 miles.

Vary Your Terrain
In Seattle you have lots of opportunity to get a great workout on hills. But don't overdo it or you'll increase you Achilles tendonitis risk. Vary the type of terrain you run or hike on from day to day or even on the same day. Do hills one day and run Greenlake another day. Mix it up.

Don't Forget to Warm-up
Both new and veteran athletes should warm up before working out. Dynamic warm-ups for runners are a great way to go.

Gradually Increase Your Training Time
You might want to get ready to run that race with your friends and end up overdoing it. Unfortunately your Achilles can't adapt that quickly to a huge increase in your training regimen. Do your Achilles a favor--increase training time by no more than 10% a week to avoid injury.

Change Up Your Exercise Routine
You might love to run but it's great to take a break by swimming or cycling to reduce strain on your Achilles.

How to Treat Achilles Tendonitis

At home

  • Pay attention to your body. If you're feeling pain in the back of your heel, back off from your exercise

  • Icing the back of your heel will help reduce inflammation

  • Toss your worn out shoes

  • Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication for a period of time. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medication.
     

At the podiatrist's office

  • Immobilizing the foot can reduce imflammation and pain; this is most commonly done with a walking boot
  • Getting fit with custom orthotics - see above.
  • Receiving MLS laser therapy for pain relief and reduction of inflammation
  • Getting referred to physical therapy for strengthening exercises, soft-tissue massage/mobilization, and gait and running education.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

For chronic heel pain, download our eBook, "Stop Living With Stubborn Heel Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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You're a runner and you've had to deal with foot and knee injuries. A new study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine provides more evidence running lightly can reduce injuries.

The effects of running lightly have been studied before. In 2016, I wrote a blog about a study of light footed women runners done at Harvard. In this study women who ran more lightly never got injured.

The new study measured the landing impact of 320 novice runners.Half the runners were told to run softer while the other half were not. After 12 months, those who learned to run softer had a 62 percent decrease in injuries than the runners who made no change.

What Does It Take to Run Softer

  • Think about running more softly and quietly when you're running; another study showed that runners who were told to run softly and quietly could reduce their foot impact.
  • Land on your mid or forefoot instead of the heel (Video on low impact running).
  • Use quick foot strikes and a shorter stride.
  • Try Chi Running which takes some of its principles from Tai Chi. You can also purchase the app of the same name.

In addition to running softer there are many other things you can do to reduce your chances of developing foot injuries such as Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis.

  • Increase your mileage slowly. Most experts recommend only a 10% increase each week.

  • Always stretch before you run. We recommend Dynamic Warm-ups for the best results. Tight calf muscles often play a huge role in developing heel pain and Achilles tendonitis. Here is what we recommend for patients who already have these conditions with tight calf muscles.

  • Make sure your shoes fit properly and aren't worn out.

  • Running can affect your hips, back, knees, and feet. Don't ignore pain. It's a signal that something is amiss.

More information on pain free running:
8 Hacks To Prevent Running Injuries this Summer
4 Lacing Hacks To Reduce Painful Running Problems
5 Tips to Keep Runner's Feet Healthy and Strong

If you're a runner experiencing hip, back, knee or foot pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

By Dr. Rion Berg
May 11, 2018
Category: Heel pain

Just about this time of year my office starts to fill up with patients who decide to take up running to get in shape, lose weight, or challenge themselves by racing. Although I love taking care of people, I'd rather make sure they don't get injured in the first place.

Running is definitely an injury-prone sport. Fortunately there are lots of things you can do to prevent running injuries this summer. Here are 8 sure fire hacks that will greatly reduce your risk of a running injury or foot problem like plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, or an ingrown toenail.

Start Slowly

If you're new to running or you've run in the past but haven't for a while, it's important to start slowly. Even if you lay off running for a few weeks, research shows the bodies' tolerance diminishes during that short time. Instead of returning to your usual five miles a day, take it easy.

Start off running for 10-15 minutes at a time and increase by 10% a week. That way your chance of a foot injury is far less.

Stop Running If Your Feet Hurt
Although it should go without saying, it always amazes me how many people just assume that pain is a good thing. I think it comes from that saying "no pain, no gain". When it comes to foot pain if you feel pain, you won't gain. You'll only lose and end up with an injury. So stop running when your feet or any part of your body starts to hurt.

Make Sure Your Shoes Fit and Aren't Worn Out

Wear the Right Socks

Although you won't get heel pain or Achilles tendonitis from wearing cotton socks you will get some nasty blisters. Avoid cotton and buy socks made out of synthetic materials that wick away moisture.

Do Proper Stretching

We've all heard that we need to stretch before we run, but most of us don't do it for long enough or correctly. A simple calf stretch done for a minute or less is usually not enough for most people to really make much difference. If you are prone to heel pain or Achilles tendonitis, tight calf muscles are frequently part of the problem. I recommend my patients who already have heel pain or are prone to it use an Achilles splint for 30 minutes a day to stretch their calves.

Dynamic warm-ups are also important to get your body ready for running. Some evidence shows that doing a static stretch right before running can inhibit performance.

Avoid High Heels

Frequent wear of high heels leads to shortened calf muscles. Tight calf muscles are often a big factor in bringing on plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. If you plan to wear high heels and also run, try to avoid going directly from heels to running.

Change Up Your Exercise

Rather than run every day, go swimming, do yoga, or another aerobic activity. Changing up your exercise will make you less prone to injury. Also, a strong core can help you recover more easily after tripping on a rock or other object in the road.

Eat A Healthy Diet

Staying hydrated and eating a healthy diet are also important for preventing injuries. You're less likely to lose steam and turn an ankle. Also, women who are too thin or are post-menopausal are at greater risk for stress fractures.

If you feel pain while running, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

March Madness is upon us! If your children are dreaming about playing college basketball and they're either on a middle school or high school team you should know that competitive basketball is very hard on the feet and ankles. Although you can't prevent all their foot and ankle problems, here are five tips to give them a fighting chance of leaving the court injury-free.

  • Suggest they play on an indoor court whenever possible. Wood floors provide the most shock absorption while concrete provides the least.

  • Purchase new basketball specific shoes before the bottom of the shoe becomes smooth. For kids who play on a team (5 days a week of practice), replace their basketball shoes every two to three months.

  • If your child has flat feet or another biomechanical foot problem, custom orthotics will help prevent heel pain, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis.

  • Proper warm-ups are essential for injury prevention. Both stretching exercises and gradual warm-ups such as dynamic warm-ups are recommended. In addition, doing calf stretches are important to prevent the foot problems mentioned above.

  • Purchase socks made of materials that do not absorb sweat. Avoid cotton and purchase synthetic materials that wick away moisture to prevent blisters.

Of course if your child does sustain an injury, first aid should include rest, ice, compression, and elevation of the injured foot or ankle. Bring them in to see your podiatrist as soon as possible so they can be properly evaluated and treated.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Julia Hawkins was 101 when she set a world record for the 100 meter dash, only a year after she started running. And she's not alone. Each year hundreds of men and women are taking to running later in life. And many of them are competing in marathons. Over half of the people competing in the New York Marathon are over 40. And their running times are getting better.

As a Seattle podiatrist who sees many patients with Type II diabetes I'm thrilled to see so much enthusiasm for exercise in older adults.

Running can help you prevent and manage many chronic illnesses, make you sharper, and give you a greater sense of wellbeing. Although running isn't for everyone and you should certainly see your doctor before giving it a try, it can be a tremendous way to live well into your later years.

Runners over 50 suffer from the same kind of foot problems as younger people including plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and ankle sprains. One difference is older adults take longer to recover from these injuries than their younger counterparts.

Recommendations for older runners include:

  • Supplement running with strength and flexibility exercises. Check out the book by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's workout coach for some exercises you can do in the gym or at home.

  • Always warm-up before your run. Although warm-ups are important for all runners, they are a must for older runners. I recommend dynamic warm-ups for runners.

  • Purchase appropriate running shoes. Check out my previous blog "How to Buy the Best Running Shoes".

  • Buy running shoes with more cushioning if you've lost fat from the pads of your feet, a common problem as we age.

  • Wear inserts or get custom orthotics made by a podiatrist particularly if you have flat feet or another biomechanical problem.

  • Eating an anti-inflammatory diet may help with age-related arthritis pain in the feet, knees, and hips.

  • Take Vitamin D and eat calcium rich foods to prevent stress fractures. As we age we lose bone mass and are more prone to bone-related health problems.

More information:
5 Tips to Keep Runner's Feet Healthy and Strong
7 Hacks to Prevent Toenail Fungus in Runners
Don't Let Heel Pain Ruin Your Morning Run

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners". In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+