Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for: October, 2016

By Dr. Rion Berg
October 26, 2016
Category: Bunions
Tags: running shoes  

You've had bunions ever since you were a teen and they seem to be getting worse. Bunions most often develop in woman with flexible, flat feet that pronate or roll in. Bunions can worsen over time by wearing shoes that are tight, high, and pointy.

Not only do bunions affect your everyday life, but also hamper your ability to run without a lot of pain. Part of the solution is to visit a Seattle podiatrist to correct your improper foot mechanics with orthotics, but you'll also need to know the best shoes to buy to provide the most comfort when you hit the trail.

Start by going to a store that specializes in running. Not only will they need to know about your bunions but about your foot type, how often you run, and where your foot strikes the ground. We recommend Super Jock 'N Jill, Brooks, or REI; all have very knowledgeable sales people who can help you find a shoe that will accommodate your needs.

Here are some suggestions for shoes that can work well for you depending on your foot type:

Runners with Flat or Low Arched Feet    

Flat feet or feet with low arches are the most common foot type for people with bunions. Runners with flat feet will need the greatest amount of arch support to keep your foot in a neutral position. Wide Motion-Control Running Shoes are going to keep your feet in alignment better than another type of shoe. In addition, because they are wide they can accommodate your bunions. Two shoes that Super Jock 'N Jill recommends are the Brook's adrenaline and the Saucony guide.

Runners with Arched, Neutral Feet

Although less common bunions can occur in women with good arches and feet that don't pronate. The main concern for these runners is finding a shoe that has a wider toe box to lessen pressure on the bunion.

Other Pain Relieving Suggestions

In addition, we recommend Dr. Jill's Gel Bunion Cushion to reduce friction and use a lacing strategy that will allow the greatest amount of room in the toebox.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment in 2 weeks or less. You can also request an appointment online.

Download our foot book "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
October 21, 2016
Category: Bunions

You're all about being proactive when it comes to buying products, particularly those that affect your health, like running shoes. After scouring the internet you've learned about the importance of bringing in your old pair to show your wear patterns, your usual running distance, where your foot strikes the ground, your foot type, and any injuries you may have sustained.

If you have plantar fasciitis or bunions, you may have also had orthotics made by your Seattle podiatrist. But there's one hack that can improve comfort even more.

The lacing hack!

Recently the Washington Post wrote an article on this topic focusing on how you can lace your shoes so that you can get better performance when you run and feel better too.

We found the website Katie Runs This to get the lowdown on the exact techniques you'll need for your foot type or foot problem.

Bunions and Wide Forefeet
Orthotics can help tremendously with correcting the biomechanics of your foot to offload your bunions but proper lacing can help even more. This specific lacing technique can widen your forefoot to accommodate the bunion. From the bottom of the eye row, lace up the sides of the shoe. You won't start cross-lacing until you reach your midfoot and then tying the top as usual.

High Instep
The runner with a high instep does the best in a neutral, cushioned shoe. In addition this lacing tip will help with your comfort and performance. This technique starts at the toe of the shoe with a cross-lacing pattern and then doesn't lace again until the top of the shoe. It provides the room you need at the middle of the foot and keeps the shoe from feeling too tight across the arch.

Narrow Feet
The runner with narrow feet in many ways has the opposite problem of the high arched runner. If you can't find a shoe that will fit snugly enough at the midfoot here is a lacing technique that adds a loop right where you need it. Crosslace the shoe starting at the toe and then create a loop that you will thread through it to make it more snug. Continue lacing as usual.

Black Toenail
If you have a tendency to get black toenails, you'll need to allow the material above your big toe to be pulled up and off of the nail when the outside lace is tugged and tied tightly. The special threading technique will accomplish this goal mentioned in Katie's website.

If you're experiencing pain when you run, you can try a new lacing technique but it's also important to see a podiatrist to ensure you get a full evaluation. Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

More tips about running and your feet:
5 Tips to Keep Runner's Feet Healthy and Strong
6 Hacks To Prevent Running Moms From Foot Injuries
7 Ways Runners Can Safely Manage Type II Diabetes

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Photo credit: Katie Runs This blog

 


On brilliantly, beautiful days like today we all crave spending more time outside before the rain sets in for months on end. For most of us going out for a stroll in a park is no big deal, but for older adults and people with diabetes walking can lead to falls--in fact 25% of older adults fall each year. For people with diabetes the annual incidence rises to 39%.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) many problems can lead to increased fall risk for those over 65.

  • Problems with balance

  • Use of medications that can interfere with balance such as tranquilizers, sedatives, or anti-depressants.

  • Problems with vision

  • Foot pain or improper foot wear

  • Lower body weakness

  • Vitamin D deficiency

People with diabetes particularly those with peripheral neuropathy have additional fall risks including:

  • Decreased or no sensation in the feet

  • Impaired sweat and oil production which can place abnormal pressure on the bones and joints when walking

  • Muscle weakness

  • Painful foot problems such as bunions or hammertoe can cause pain that makes walking difficult.

    At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City, Dr. Rion Berg specializes in treating patients with diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. We also offer a special "In Balance Fall Prevention Program". Even if you don't have diabetes, if you're over 65 and experiencing foot problems there is a lot that can be done to reduce or eliminate your pain so you can continue to enjoy the bright sunny days while they're still here.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+