Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for: May, 2015

By Dr. Rion Berg
May 28, 2015
Category: Heel pain
Tags: orthotics   foot balance  

You've spent hours planning for your families' summer vacation. Figuring out what will work for you, your husband and teens can sometimes be a daunting experience. Now you've found the perfect trip and everything seems ready to go.

Well almost everything.

You took a jog yesterday. And this morning when your feet hit the floor you knew you were in a heap of trouble. Your heel pain was back and your worn out orthotics weren't going to do the trick--particularly when walking and hiking long distances.

You can stop worrying. At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City we have the solution that will solve your heel pain instantly.

We use Foot Balance--a customized comfort support that we make in our office while you wait. And the great thing is that they will last 6-12 months and won't break your pocketbook. You can wear them in your athletics shoes, hiking boots, or casual shoes.

As a Seattle podiatrist I've found these inserts to be perfect for my patients who need instant relief but don't have time to wait for a prescriptive orthotic.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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You love wearing heels. Sometimes they hurt and give you blisters--but your young and can deal with it.

Not so fast.

According to a new study from the University of Alabama people in their 20s and 30s are most at risk for high heel injuries that go way beyond a simple blister.

The study revealed that the number of injuries for high heel wearers in the US doubled from 2002 and 2012. The stand-out year for high heel injuries was 2011 with 19,000 accidents. Eighty percent of the injuries involved sprains and strains to the foot and ankle and 20% involved the knee, trunk, shoulder or head and neck.

These are pretty sobering statistics. As a Seattle podiatrist I offer the following advice to those who still aren't convinced to give up their stilettos.

  • Don't run or participate in other risky activities in heels.

  • Avoid wearing high heels when pregnant--your center of gravity shifts making falls more likely

  • Limit high heel use--wear for special occasions or alternate heels with a lower option

High heel wear also adds risk for other foot conditions such as bunion formation and exacerbation and hammertoe development. Although you may be in your 20s or 30s and have great looking feet, bunions develop overtime. If you have a parent with bunions, you are more at risk due to inherited foot type.

If you've experienced a sprain or twisted ankle from wearing heels, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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What? I just read that women who attended the Cannes Film Festival red carpet screening were turned away for not showing up in star studded high heels. This is just ridiculous. Apparently some women who showed up in fancy flats were told they weren't following the dress code, even though the code didn't mention obligatory high heels. And some of these women had foot problems.

The good thing is that the festival is catching flack for not admitting these women. I see this as a small victory for women everywhere, particularly if this forces the festival to change their policy.

High heels are notoriously bad particularly if they are part of your daily fare. You are most at risk for developing bunions and hammertoes as a result of high heels as they place constant, unnatural pressure on the front of your foot. Also, pointy shoes squeeze your toes setting you up for other problems such as ingrown toenails and toenail fungus.

As a Seattle podiatrist I know you're still going to wear high heels occasionally, no matter what I say. But in the hours you wear something else, I recommend a shoe of 1 inch or less with a wider toebox.

Flat shoes can actually be a problem for constant high heel wearers. High heels cause calf muscles to shorten. Going straight to flat shoes from heels can stretch out the muscle causing tears in the heel resulting in plantar fasciitis. I see this frequently in the spring and summer when women break out their flatter shoes.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an immediate appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
May 19, 2015
Category: diabetes
Tags: toenail fungus   Sterishoe+   vionics  

As spring heats up it's pretty apparent this Seattle summer could rival last years in the number of hot and sunny days  we could get.

As a Seattle podiatrist specializing in diabetic foot care, I want to make sure you know exactly what to do to keep your feet safe this as the temperature rises. After all, you don't want to come and see me more then you have to.

Don't go barefoot
Like most people, you may be tempted to go barefoot this summer because it feels so great. But--don't even think about it.

Very likely you have neuropathy that reduces sensation in the feet. Even small cuts and abrasions you can't feel can set you up for an infection. Infections can lead to ulcers which are often very difficult to treat and can lead to amputation.

Choose the right shoes
Although closed-toed shoes are still the best choice as they excel in keeping your feet protected and supported--other good choices are CrocsRx and Vionic Unisex Wave Toe Post Sandal.

Take care of sweaty feet
As the weather heats up its inevitable that those prone to sweaty feet will sweat even more. And that's particular bad for people with diabetes--excess moisture is a breeding ground for bacteria and fungus.

Make sure you change your socks frequently, wear socks such as Dr. Comfort that regulate foot temperature, and rotate your shoes to let them dry out.

Keep your shoes free of fungus
Diabetics are more prone to getting toenail fungus and toenail fungus can increase risk of diabetic ulcers. To help prevent your shoes from contributing to this problem I recommend using SteriShoe+ Ultraviolet Shoe Sanitizer.

Apply sunscreen to your feet
Your feet are often the last place you think about when lathering on sunscreen. But did you know that melanoma--the cancer with the highest death rate--is the most common cancer found on feet? Be sure to apply it to both the tops and bottoms of your dogs when you plan to expose your toes.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an immediate appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Picture of Dr. Rion BergSeattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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As a runner you've had all kinds of problems and injuries with your feet and ankles. Fortunately, most of them have resolved after treatment. However, there is one injury that is commonly misdiagnosed and can be dangerous without proper treatment.

Achilles tendinosis.

What's that you might be wondering? You're heard of Achilles tendonitis, so what's this tendonosis all about.

Achilles tendonitis and Achilles tendinosis are totally different problems.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an overuse injury that causes inflammation around the tendon. You'll often experience it as a mild pain that gradually worsens--other symptoms are redness, swelling, and warmth. At this point your body is telling you to stop, rest, and heal.

And that's the problem -- if you're a full on athlete that doesn't want to give up your sport for anything this mild inflammatory problem can turn into Achilles Tendonosis, a much more severe problem.

Achilles Tendinosis

Over time you'll receive this diagnosis which instead of inflammation results in a thickening of the tendon. Achilles tendinosis is progressive and degenerative.

When Achilles tendinosis is misdiagnosed, treatments for inflammation won't work. Physical therapists can end up providing inappropriate exercises that can make the problem worse. The best way to diagnose this problem is by MRI.

Fortunately there are treatments for Achilles tendinosis. Arch supports to correct biomechanical problems, immobilization with a boot, and proper stretching. Severe cases may require injections or surgery to prevent rupture.

As a Seattle podiatrist I can't emphasize enough the importance of getting treatment if you have an Achilles problem that won't resolve.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs. Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an immediate appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.