Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for: January, 2013

By Dr. Rion Berg
January 25, 2013

Whether you are a soccer mom or grandmother, you should know that your little athlete is at greater risk for foot and ankle injuries.

Here are some of the problems that your young soccer player may encounter:

How you can help prevent them from getting these injuries:

  • Before starting to play bring your athlete for a pre-season physical examination with your doctor
  • Make sure their muscles are in condition for soccer; about a month before they begin to play they should be starting to practice their soccer moves slowly with you or a buddy in order to  build muscle strength and mobility
  • Remind them to drink plenty of water even before they get thirsty
  • Teach them to warm up prior to playing soccer; for example, a slow jog and then muscle stretches
  • Choose athletic shoes made for soccer; also check with your doctor to assess if they have any specific foot issues that might predispose them to foot injuries
  • Replace athletic shoes every six months
  • Teach them to pay attention to their bodies; they should tell you or their coach if they have pain or discomfort
  • Overuse injuries can also occur in young athletes; sometimes they may need to take a substantial break in their activity in order to allow the body to heal properly.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
January 18, 2013
Category: diabetes
Tags: fungus nails  

Diabetic patients are at greater risk for developing a fungal nail infection than those who don't. In addition, fungal nails may lead to a limb threatening infection in diabetics.

Why?

A diabetic patient who develops peripheral neuropathy or loss of sensation, may not be able to feel increased pressure on the nail. For example, wearing shoes that are too tight can cause the nail to lift letting in fungus.

From there, the fungus may spread to the surrounding skin, causing tinea pedis or athlete’s foot with cracks opening and further infection developing. In one study, there was a 15% rate of secondary infections in diabetic patients with fungus toenails compared to a 6% rate in diabetic patients without fungus toenails. In addition, diabetic patients with toenail fungus, had three times greater risk of developing a foot ulceration (wound).

If you have diabetes and thickened fungal toenails, you should consider treatment to resolve this problem. Over the years, we have prescribed oral and topical medications. We also use laser treatment, a painless effective means of treating onychomycosis. 

If you have thickened toenails that may have a fungal infection call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

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Your feet are a marvelous creation. Heed your built in warning system to keep them from going over the edge this New Year.  

So what is this early warning system? Our feet let us know when they are approaching danger. So often patients ask why all of a sudden they are developing foot pain.  Most of the time they don’t have severe foot deformities and are inclined to ignore their pain.  The truth is that your foot can take a lot of abuse, but when you accumulate too much stress, you may push it over the edge and begin to develop chronic foot pain.

So what causes the pain if you haven’t had an injury? The way I like to explain this, is to compare it to your hands. Our fingers have to move all the time and as long as we move them within a certain range, we don’t have pain. However, our feet must bear all our weight as the joints move. You have to add to this the amount of time you are on your feet during the day including when you exercise. As long as our weight is evenly distributed throughout the foot as we move forward, and we work our joints within a certain range, our feet are happy.

However, if you add too much weight, have muscles of the lower leg that are too tight, overdo certain activities, have too low or too high an arch, or wear shoes that aren’t appropriate for the activity you are doing,  you may activate your early warning system and develop pain.  This is telling you to STOP!  What a great system we have . We just need to heed the signals when we’re reaching the edge, and stop the activity.

With this New Year, review your checklist. Make sure your shoes are in good shape, and you are wearing the right shoe for the right activity. If you begin to develop discomfort, use Rest, Ice, Elevation, Compression, Stretching. Adding inserts such as Superfeet or Powerstep can also be very helpful (check out our online store for these products http://www.ourdoctorstore.com/bergdpm/.

If you’ve tried the above, and your computerized foot is still sending out a distress signal, pay attention to it, and have a professional evaluate your feet.  Don’t let your feet go over the cliff!