Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for category: preventative foot care

feet soaking in tub of waterPumice stones can be a wonderful adjunct to your foot care regimen. When used correctly these stones are an excellent tool for keeping your feet smooth and free of tough, dead skin. They also can keep your corns and calluses in check. However, improper use can cause pain, so be sure to follow these instructions.

Step 1: Gather Your Supplies

  • Bucket or tub

  • Pumice stone

  • Moisturizer

  • Bristled brush for cleaning the stone

Step 2: Soak Your Feet in Warm Water

It's important to soak your feet in warm water for 5-10 minutes to soften up the skin before using the stone.

  • Fill up a bucket or tub with water and put in your feet.

  • Wait until your skin is soft. If after 10 minutes the skin still feels rough add a few more minutes to your soak.

  • Add a few drops of essential oil and Epsom salt for a spa-like experience. Epsom salts can help relax your muscles.

Step 3: Wet the Stone

Wetting the stone helps it glide more easily over your skin. Never use a dry pumice stone as it can cause abrasions on your skin.

  • Either run the stone under warm water or let it soak along with your feet in the bucket or tub.

Step 4: Pat Your Skin Dry With A Towel

Step 5: Rub Your Skin Over Tough Skin

  • Rub the abrasive side of the pumice stone over your skin in a circular motion using light pressure.

  • If the skin is soft it should come off easily.

  • Do this until you remove the dead skin; about 2-3 minutes.

  • Stop if your skin feels sensitive or sore.

Step 6: Rinse and Repeat

Rinse off the dead skin and examine your feet to see if it needs more sloughing. If you still see dead pieces of skin, go over the area again with the pumice stone.

  • Consider turning the pumice stone over to reveal a fresh surface to improve its exfoliation ability.

  • Rinse the stone frequently to keep its surface clean and effective.

Step 7: Dry and Moisturize Your Skin Afterwards

  • Pat your skin dry

  • Use Amerigel moisturizer to replenish your skin.

Step 8: Cleaning Your Pumice Stone

Clean your stone after each use.

  • Wash it using a scrub brush or nail brush while holding under warm water.

  • Add some soap to clean it thoroughly.

  • Allow the stone to completely dry out to prevent bacteria from growing in the pores. Stones with strings can be hung up.

  • Boil your stone in water for 5 minutes to deep clean it. Use tongs to remove it from the water. If you use it every week, consider boiling every other week or once a month.

Step 9: Replace Your Stone When It's Worn Down

When it gets too small to handle, replace your stone.

Cautions:

  • Like all personal hygiene implements, don't share your pumice stone with other people to reduce the chance of infection.

  • People with diabetes should ask their podiatrist before using a pumice stone as diabetic skin can develop wounds.

  • Consider talking with your podiatrist before using your stone to remove corns or calluses even if you don't have diabetes.

If you have pain or other concerns about your feet, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
January 22, 2020
Tags: Untagged

woman trying on shoesAs traffic in Seattle gets worse and women and men have more responsibilities at home and at work, more of my patients are opting to shop for shoes on Amazon or Zappos even though I always recommend a brick and mortar store.

If you happen to be one of those compelled by necessity to order your shoes online I have some tips that will make your experience more successful.

Measure Your Feet

It would be great if our feet would stay the same size after we reach adulthood but unfortunately for many of us this is not the case. An increase in shoe size is common. The most important part of buying a pair of shoes online is getting an accurate measurement of your feet. You could simply hop on down to your local shoe store and get measured or you can do it yourself at home. Here's how to measure your feet using a standard tape measure and how to convert this measurement to the correct size.

Only Keep Shoes That Fit

Keep in mind that shoes should feel comfortable when you try them on. While many of us learned that shoes require a break-in period, that's not true anymore. If a pair of shoes is uncomfortable when you try them on no amount of wearing them is likely to improve that outcome. More often the shoes will feel more uncomfortable the more you wear them. And that's just a recipe for foot pain. Keep those cute shoes in the box and return them.

If you want to be sure, wear them for several hours around your house.

Use An Online Store That Returns Shoes for Free

If the shoes don't fit properly, return them. That's where using an online store that allows free returns comes in handy. Amazon owns Zappos so both of these stores will allow you to return shoes for free. Likely other stores have followed suit. Just be sure you read the fine print to find out about their return policy including whether or not they accept shoes that have been worn outside.

Stick With the Tried and True

To have the best outcome with online shoe purchases, buy from brands that have worked for you in the past. Because brands may use a different last (the form used for making shoes) for making different styles of shoes it's also best to stick with a style that has worked well.

Read the Description

The shoes may look beautiful but the materials may be of poor quality. It's always a good idea to read the description to make sure you're getting the materials you were hoping for.

Keep A Shoe Log
To help you with your shoe purchases in the future, keep a shoe log. Keep track of the date, shoe brand, shoe name, and shoe size being sure to include both the length and the width. Although you could go back to your original shoes sometimes the sizes rub off and not everyone likes to save the boxes. This could save you a lot of time and trouble when making new purchases.

Follow Your Podiatrist's Recommendations

No matter where you buy your shoes, there are a few recommendations I make to all my patients who are looking to buy a new pair of shoes.

 

  • shop for and/or try on your online shoes at the end of the day when feet are likely to be most swollen.

  • buy shoes for your longest foot

  • try on your shoes with your orthotics

  • don't have orthotics but still want good support; remove the inserts the shoes came with and insert a pair of Powersteps.

  • choose shoes with a roomier toe box

  • choose shoes with a heel no higher than one inch

  • test your shoes to ensure they'll provide good support

 

Having problems finding shoes that fit or ones that won't cause pain, give us a call today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

 

 

Photo by Immortal shots - See latest from PexelsAs Seattleites we're experts when it comes to getting around in the rain, but once the rain turns to snow we tend to throw our hands up in the air and just shake our heads. Many of us stay home because we dread slipping and falling.

As your podiatrist I can't blame you. The last thing I want is for my patients to twist or break an ankle or sustain any other bodily harm. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics your fear of falling is well founded. In 2014, ice, snow, and sleet caused more than 42,000 injuries and illnesses.

But what if you have to leave your home to go to work, do some shopping, take your kid to the doctor, or any number of errands that won't wait until the snowy, icy weather passes.

Here are 7 strategies to help you get around more safely should you need to head out of your cozy abode.

Choose Your Shoes Wisely
Your shoes can greatly affect your stability, so it's important to select the right pair.

  • Wear shoes that cover as much ground as possible (avoid heels or choose a chunky, wider heel).
  • Choose footwear made of non-slip rubber or neoprene composite with grooved soles.
  • Avoid leather soles
  • Purchase boots that can pass a slip resistance test. The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute has tested hundreds of boots in their WinterLab and now the results can be found on the website Rate My Treads.
  • Use treads or cleats such as Yaktrax to improve your grip.

Adjust Your Stride

  • Go slow and easy
  • Take shorter steps or shuffle
  • Bend slightly forward with your center of gravity directly over your feet and walk flat footed.
  • Extend your arms out to your sides for better balance

Plan Out Your Route

As much as possible plan out where you're going to walk. Although it may not be as easy to walk in fresh snow it can be safer than snow that's been around for awhile since it probably won't be as slippery.

  • Assume all wet, dark areas are icy - some ice is obvious, while other ice can be just underneath packed down snow. Black ice can be the most treacherous since it can be very tough to see.
  • Use handrails when walking down steps since they are often icy.
  • Avoid slopes and hills when you can.
  • Avoid walking in the street. If you can't avoid it, walk facing traffic and stay as far from cars as possible. Don't assume they can stop.
  • Look ahead when you walk. If you see the sidewalk is covered in ice, see if the grass next to it is a better bet.
  • Give yourself extra time; that way you won't be in a hurry and take unnecessary risks.

Keep Yourself Visible

Too many of us wear black coats in the winter. It's nearly impossible for cars to see a person in the dark who's wearing black. If you do a lot of walking the following items can help you stay visible.

  • Wear a coat that is bright and neon colored.
  • A reflective vest, belt, lights or snap bands will make you highly visible to drivers; these items can be purchased at REI.

What To Do If You Slip
Sometimes slipping is inevitable. Here's what to do according to Julia Henderson-Kalb, M.S., OTR/L:

  • Keep your hands out of your pockets so you can break your fall with your hands.
  • If you start to fall backwards tuck your head forward with chin to chest. Extend your arms away from your body and hit the ground with your palms and forearms to prevent your head, wrists, and elbows from hitting the ground.
  • If you fall to the side, try to allow your forearm to make contact with the ground first, not your hand. Lift your head to the opposite shoulder and continue to roll
  • If you fall forward, try to roll to one side and follow the last instructions.

Keep Your Driveway and Sidewalks Clear

Help yourself and your neighbors prevent slips and falls by clearing your driveway and sidewalks as soon as the snow hits. Once snow warms up, melts, and then turns to ice you'll need salt or gravel to melt it and make it more walkable.

What To Do If You Sprain Your Ankle

If you slip and fall and injury your ankle deploy the RICE protocol.

  • Rest- keep weight off of the ankle until your physician or surgeon tells you otherwise.
  • Ice & Compression - as soon as you are able, an ice pack should be applied to the area (with a layer of cloth between your skin and the ice) and held in place with an ace wrap or elastic bandage to provide compression.
  • Elevation- Elevate your feet higher than your heart to promote drainage from the swollen area.

Be sure to make an appointment with our office so we can ensure your ankle isn't broken or there isn't extensive soft tissue damage.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

pregnant women doing tree poseYou just found out you're pregnant. Along with the joy of having a new baby comes the uncertainty about your health and how well you'll adapt to your changing body. For many women this is a smooth transition, while others have to contend with swollen feet and plantar fasciitis.

One problem that's rarely discussed is the increased likelihood of falls. About 25% of women fall during pregnancy and 10% fall more than once. Falls pose a risk to both the baby and the mother. So learning more about what to do to mitigate this risk is essential.

Why Pregnant Women Fall

In addition to weight gain, your center of gravity changes making it harder to maintain stability when you walk. Hormones also increase during pregnancy. One of those hormones relaxin helps to loosen ligaments and other body structures in preparation for childbirth. It also increases the force on joints, increases pelvic tilt, and loosens ligaments in the feet. All of these factors contribute to changes in balance which increases risk for trips and falls.

A study in 2019 that tracked 15 pregnant women found that their balance worsened as their pregnancy progressed. Women in the study with poor balance before pregnancy had the worst balance during pregnancy. Another study found that balance during walking decreases throughout pregnancy.

What You Can Do To Prevent Falls

Fortunately, you can reduce your risk of falling by conditioning your body to adjust to the changes in your balance and by wearing supportive shoes.

Exercise to Prevent Falls During Pregnancy

Regular exercise during pregnancy helps improve your posture and decreases discomfort and fall risk. Maintaining a strong core, thighs, and hips creates a solid foundation for your changing body and its balance. Make sure you talk to your doctor before taking on a new exercise program.

Exercises recommendation by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists include walking, swimming, riding a stationary bicycle, prenatal yoga and Pilates classes.

In addition to engaging in the exercises above, some specific strength and balance exercises to do are:

  • Pelvic tilts- these maintain and build core strength.

  • Squats - strengthen quads, glutes, hamstrings, and calves.

  • Hip extensions - strengthen hip and lower back muscles.

  • Alternate standing on one leg and then the other, with a chair for balance if you need it.

For additional exercises, check out these offered by Therapeutic Associates Physical Therapy to strengthen pelvic floor, core, and posture.

Proper Foot Support

Proper foot support is essential during this delicate time. The following tips will help ensure your shoes can help reduce your risk for falls.

  • Make sure your shoes fit well - when purchasing new shoes, be sure to have your feet measured. It's not uncommon for pregnant women to experience an increase in shoe size.

  • Don't wear shoes with worn out soles - turn your shoes over. If you see an uneven wear pattern you very likely need new shoes. Worn out shoes won't support you during your pregnancy and can increase your chance for a fall.

  • Struggling with swollen feet? - buy shoes that will accommodate them but are also sturdy. A good example of a shoe that does both is the SAS shoe called Bliss.

  • Consider inserts or custom orthotics if you pronate - even if you don't have heel pain or plantar fasciitis it's still a good idea to replace your insoles with an over-the-counter insert like Powersteps, particularly if you tend to pronate when you walk. If you are experiencing foot pain not alleviated by an over-the-counter insert you'll likely need a custom orthotic.

  • Shop for shoes at the end of the day - you may already have swollen feet, but they'll be even more swollen towards the end of the day. Shop too early and you risk buying a shoe that's too small.

  • Be sure to avoid any exercises that increase your risk of falling.

  • Avoid wearing high heels as they can throw off your already precarious balance.

  • Test your shoes for stability - shoes should bend at the toe not in the center, be difficult to twist when you try to wring them out, and have a stiff heel counter that you can't move easily. For more information, watch the video: How to Test Any Shoe for Stability.

If you're pregnant and experiencing foot pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
July 30, 2019
Tags: Untagged

When a new patient comes to my office, it's more likely to be a woman than a man. While it's true that women are more likely to see a doctor for a health issue sooner than a man, women are also at greater risk for many common foot problems. In this guide I'll be discussing the 1) types of foot problems women are likely to encounter, 2) the role of foot type and shoes in developing foot problems, 3) the role of exercise in women's foot and ankle problems, and 4) how to prevent and treat foot and ankle problems in women.

The Role of Foot Type in Women's Foot Problems
All of us have a particular foot type: either a flat arch, normal arch, or high arch. If you have a normal arch, you're fortunate. Although people with normal arches can still develop foot problems they are far fewer than those who have a flat arch or high arch.

It's important to know what kind of foot type you have so you can prevent some of the foot conditions that plague women. Your foot type is inherited, so if your parents had a specific foot type you're more likely to have it as well.

To determine your foot type, wet the sole of your foot. Step onto a blank piece of paper or a shopping bag. Step off the paper or shopping bag to examine the shape of your footprint and compare it to the photo to the right.

If you have flat feet you'll tend to role your feet inward or pronate. Pronation can increase your risk for many painful foot problems such as plantar fasciitis, bunions, neuroma, and hammertoes. High arches can put you more at risk for ball of foot pain.

Painful Foot Conditions More Common to Women
You might wonder why women are more likely to have painful foot conditions than men. While flat feet contribute to foot problems in both men and women, women get them more often for three reasons:
1) a greater amount of weight gain throughout life, 2) rapid weight gain during pregnancy, and
3) improper shoe choices.

Weight Gain Can Cause Foot Problems
Weight gain places more pressure on the feet causing the arch to flatten out. For women who already have a flat arch, weight gain can make them flatter. Women who gain weight are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis, bunions, and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Shoe size also increases with extra weight due to the flattening of the arch. It's important for women who have gained weight to get their feet measured when buying new shoes to avoid foot pain caused by wearing a shoe that's too small.

Pregnancy and Foot Problems
Weight gain
Rapid weight gain during pregnancy can bring on plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis. Wearing a supportive shoe during this time is imperative.

Swelling
Another common foot and ankle issue in pregnancy is swelling. In addition to retaining extra fluid, weight from the growing uterus compresses lower extremity veins, impeding their function of returning blood to the heart.  While this usually goes away when baby arrives, it can be incredibly uncomfortable.  Elevating the feet and wearing compression stockings help to control edema. Physical activity, including walking, reduces swelling by activating the leg muscles, which act as pumps on the deep veins. It's important to avoid tight shoes and instead wear shoes with a wide toe box to help prevent other foot problems during that time.

Loss of balance
Weight gain and changes in body shape shifts a women's center of gravity forward. Hormonal changes cause loosening of the foot ligaments. This combination can throw off a women's balance. For that reason women should never wear high heels when pregnant since this type of shoe is already less stable then a lower heeled option. Wearing more stable, low-heeled shoes are essential to prevent falls.

Shoe Choices That Can Cause Foot Problems
Women often make shoe choices that can cause painful foot problems.

Frequent high heel wear can increase your risk for ball of foot pain including bunions, neuromas, and hammertoes. When wearing high heels your weight is placed primarily on the ball of the foot which places a lot of stress on the metatarsals, the toes, and the nerves.

Tight shoes or shoes that are too short can increase your risk for ingrown toenails and fungal toenails. When the toenail is pushed against the front of the shoe, hiking boot, or ski boot an ingrown toenail can result. Shoes that are too tight or too short can cause damage to the nail plate, making it easier for fungus to set up shop.

Flat shoes can increase your risk for plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis. Flat shoes with no arch support can be problematic for anyone but particularly women who have flat feet. When walking or engaging in other activities such as dancing or running the arch will flatten out causing the plantar fascia to stretch beyond its limits. This can result in pain and inflammation in the heel and at the Achilles tendon.

Shoes with no support can also cause foot pain. Women who have had problems with their feet in the past or have flat feet or high arches should not wear these types of shoes.

Pumps can be problematic for women who develop a bony enlargement called Haglund's deformity or so called "pump bump", due the location of the deformity and the rigidness of pumps. Any shoe with a rigid back can cause problems for anyone with this type of foot problem.

Flat flip flops with no arch support can lead to a myriad of foot problems for women. Flip flops were only created to be worn at the beach, swimming pool, gym locker rooms, and shower rooms. Unfortunately flip flops have become extremely popular and women wear them for long walks and for other activities that require a much more supportive shoe. The constant gripping at the toes to keep the shoe on, the flatness and lack of support, and absence of protection make flip flops problematic for women to wear off the beach. They can cause blisters, hammertoes, Achilles tendonitis, neuromas, heel pain, and worsen bunions. Their dearth of support can also lead to sprained ankles. A better choice is a Vionic sandal which is a flip flop with great support. Even better is a water sandal that has foot support and straps.

Preventing and Treating Women's Foot Conditions
Prevention
Many women's painful foot problems can be prevented or reduced by wearing proper shoes. It's important to select shoes that work well for your foot type, the kind of athletic activity you prefer, while avoiding heels higher than one inch and shoes that are too tight. Shoes also need to provide proper support. To test any shoe before you buy it, watch this video.

Treatment
While treatments vary widely by foot problem, some treatments can help resolve several types of painful foot issues. That's because several foot problems have a similar cause.

Flat feet and pronation
Earlier we talked about how foot type can play a role in women's foot problems. Flat feet and lower arched feet tend to pronate. Together these factors can cause a variety of foot problems such as plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, ball of foot pain, bunions, hammertoes, and neuromas.

Orthotics can correct the faulty biomechanics of a flatter foot providing relief from heel pain and Achilles tendonitis and preventing bunions and hammertoes from worsening. Initially I suggest patients with mild foot pain start with an over-the-counter insert such as Powerstep. If pain continues then a prescriptive custom orthotic will be required to control the abnormal foot motion.

Tight calf muscles
Heel pain, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis will also require adequate stretching of the calf muscle since a tight calf muscle also plays a big role in development of these conditions. Learn more about how to reduce tight calf muscles by reviewing this information and these videos.

Inflammation
Inflammation plays a big role in many chronic foot problems including plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis. Visit our website to learn how to reduce inflammation for these foot problems.

For acute injuries to the foot or ankle such as stubbing your toe or spraining your ankle, it's important to take immediate action to reduce the pain and swelling. The most effective treatment is a protocol called “RICE”. RICE is an acronym for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. 

  • Rest – Stop all activity. Keep weight bearing to a minimum, making sure ankle strength and stability have returned before attempting physical activities.

  • Ice - Apply an ice pack or a package of frozen peas to the affected area (use a layer of cloth between your skin and the ice) 20 mins on and 20 min off for up to 48 hours after the injury.

  • Compression - Hold it in place with an elastic bandage to provide compression.

  • Elevate - the ankle slightly higher than the heart to keep down swelling.

High arches

High arches come with their own set of foot problems. High arched feet primarily contact the ground in the heel and the ball of the foot. Pain can develop in three regions of the foot due to this foot structure.

Ball of Foot
Metatarsalgia or ball of the foot pain can occur with prolonged standing or exercise. Hammertoes can also form as a result of extra weight on that part of the foot.

Heel of the Foot
Pressure on the heel of the foot can lead to plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis.

Middle of the Foot
Because most shoes don't support the middle of the foot, high arches can result in pronounced midfoot pain.

Supportive shoes with good arches are essential for preventing problems in the high arched foot.

Ball of foot pain
Many different conditions cause ball of foot pain including neuromas, metatarsalgia, hallux rigidus, sesamoiditis, and capsulitis. For a complete review of the causes, symptoms, and treatment for these conditions, visit our website.

Nail and Skin Problems

Nail and skin problems of the feet are most often caused by tight and poor fitting shoes, and physical activity, and diabetes.

Ingrown toenails result from shoes that are too tight and by cutting the toenails on an angle instead of straight across.

Toenail fungus is more common in women who wear tight shoes, participate in sports such as running, go barefoot in pool showers and gym locker rooms, or are exposed at nail salons. Sometimes trauma to the nail can look like toenail fungus. It's best to see a podiatrist who can test the nails to be sure it is fungus. Treatment methods include topicals, oral medications, laser therapy, and methods to keep nail fungus low. To avoid toenail fungus it's important to follow these recommendations. If you already think you have fungal toenails, visit our Seattle Fungal Toenail Center to learn more about how it's treated.

Diabetes is hereditary and also more common among women who are overweight, don't exercise, and have a diet high in fats and sugars. People with diabetes are at greater risk for developing wounds or ulcers of the feet which can be very dangerous. Dry skin on the feet is very common in people with diabetes and is treated with special moisturizers. An annual visit to the podiatrist to get a Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Exam is essential to prevent ulcers from forming.

Foot and Ankle Problems in Women Who Are Physically Active

Women who are physically active are more prone to foot and ankle problems due to the repetitive movements, high impact, constricting or unsupportive footwear, or increased risk of trauma due to the nature of the sport. It's important to understand the particular risks of a sport to help prevent pain and injury.

Women runners are at greater risk for plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, neuromas, and stress fractures. Purchasing supportive running shoes at a store that specializes in running, switching out the shoe insert for a better insert such as Powerstep, avoiding high heels, and doing dynamic warm-ups will help prevent many foot problems in women runners. Here's a more complete description of foot problems in women runners.

Women hikers need to assess the type of hiking they'll be doing before purchasing boots. The right socks are also extremely important in preventing blisters. Check out my "Definitive Guide to Prevent and Treat Heel Pain in Hikers".

Learn how to prevent foot and ankle injuries in other sports such as Zumba, martial arts, soccer, and tennis.

If you're experiencing foot or ankle pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. We'll often appoint you the same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

You can also download the following book for runners.

"The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!