Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Women running

As a runner you know the importance of keeping your feet in top condition. You may be well aware of the most common cause of runner's foot pain, namely heel pain or plantar fasciitis. But another condition nearly as prevalent as heel pain in runners is Achilles tendon pain.

And this shouldn't be surprising. After all the term "Achilles heel" comes from the Greek tragedy, the Illiad. In this saga, Achilles leads the Greeks against the Trojans. A powerful warrior his only weakness is his Achilles. For today's runner this is also true. An Achilles rupture or tear can be a season ending event.

While an Achilles rupture can change the outcome of a game or race, it's by no means the most common form of Achilles tendon pain. Achilles tendonitis and it's cousin Achilles tendonosis are much more common.

What is the Achilles tendon?

The Achilles is the largest and strongest tendon in the body. It can withstand forces of up to 1000 pounds or more. It's located where the calf muscle joins the heel bone. The Achilles makes it possible for us to push off while we run, jump, or walk. Without it we would be incapable of movement. That's why when our Achilles tendon becomes inflamed or sustains an injury treatment is imperative.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. It results from micro-tears that develop as a result of too heavy or sudden pressure on the tendon. These can occur as a result of running hills, rapidly increasing training time and distance, and sprinting.

Other risk factors

Other risk factors for Achilles tendonitis are:

  • Sex (men are more prone to it)
  • Increased age
  • Over pronation resulting from flat or low arches
  • Tight calf muscles
  • Wearing unsupportive or worn out running shoes
  • Medical conditions such as psoriasis and high blood pressure
  • Taking antibiotics called fluoroquinolones.

Two types of Achilles tendonitis

There are two types of Achilles tendonitis based on where the inflammation is located, insertional and non-insertional.

Insertional

Insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs in the lower portion of the heel where the tendon inserts into the heel bone. This type of tendonitis tends to develop with years of overuse and is most commonly seen in marathoners and sprinters.

Non-insertional

Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs in the middle portion of the tendon and is more common in younger athletes.

Sign and Symptoms

  • Mild pain after running that gradually worsens.
  • Pain occurs most often after periods of rest and with first steps out of bed in the morning.
  • A dull or sharp pain along back of tendon.
  • Tenderness or sometimes intense pain can be experienced when the sides of the tendon are squeezed.

Treatment

If you're experiencing any of the signs and symptoms of Achilles tendon pain it's important to stop running. Running through your pain will make the condition worse. Rest and sometimes immobilization in a walking boot are necessary to recover from Achilles tendonitis.

In addition, treatment at home or at your podiatry office often includes the following:

Reduce the inflammation

To assist in your recovery it's important to reduce the inflammation.

  • Use ice 20 minutes out of every hour.
  • Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. Note: Consult your physician before taking any medication.
     
  • Receive MLS laser therapy for pain relief and reduction of inflammation

Improve your foot biomechanics.

  • Orthotics can help support the muscle and relieve stress on the tendon. Over-the-counter shoe inserts or custom orthotics will both work depending on your foot type and the length and severity of the problem.

Stretch your calf muscles

Adequately stretching tight calf muscles is needed in the treatment and prevention of Achilles tendonitis. One of the best ways to do this is by using an Achilles splint 1-2 times/day for 20-30 minutes while watching TV or reading a book. Please watch this video on How to Use An Achilles Splint for Stretching Calf Muscles. Sports medicine physicians and others also recommend using a foam roller as an adjunct to stretching.

Physical therapy

We recommend physical therapy for:

  • exercises to lengthen the Achilles tendon
  • strengthen the Achilles tendon
  • gait training

Surgery

Surgery may be needed if the tendon does not recover using more conservative approaches.

Prevention

It's far better to prevent Achilles tendonitis than to heal from it.

Achilles Tendonosis

Achilles tendonosis in runners is a degeneration of the collagen protein that forms the tendon. It's a response to chronic overuse without adequate time to heal and rest. When the tendon is damaged in this way, healing is haphazard and abnormal, resulting in pain when put under tension, stressed, or touched. This new tendon can be weaker, prone to re-injury and rupture if not adequately rehabilitated. The tendon will show up thicker on MRI.

Tendonitis can progress to tendonosis when treatment of the former condition has been insufficient. When the disorder progresses to degeneration, it can become enlarged and nodules can develop in the area where the tissue is damaged.

Signs and Symptoms

Runners with Achilles tendonosis will experience pain, tenderness, and stiffness without inflammation (swelling and redness) seen in Achilles tendonitis.

  • Tightness and loss of flexibility in the ankle.
  • Pain particularly after rest and upon wakening in the morning.
  • A nodule on the back of the heel
  • A jellylike consistency internally making the tendon soft and weak

Treatment and Prevention

Treatment and prevention are similar to those employed for Achilles tendonitis with special emphasis on curtailing all activities that put stress on the tendon. Immobilization will be required to ensure the tendon gets adequate healing time. Ice may be of limited value since there is typically no inflammation in this condition. MLS laser therapy has been shown to work well in healing old injuries by bringing more blood floor to the site. It could be of important value in healing Achilles tendonosis.

Achilles Tendon Rupture

An Achilles tendon rupture is a complete or partial tear that occurs when the tendon is stretched beyond its capacity. Sudden accelerations during running or a trip or fall can overstretch the tendon and cause a tear.

Achilles tendon ruptures are most often seen in "weekend warriors" – typically, middle-aged people participating in sports in their spare time. Less commonly, illness or medications, such as steroids or certain antibiotics, may weaken the tendon and contribute to ruptures.

Signs and Symptoms

While sometimes there are no signs and symptoms of Achilles tendon rupture the most common ones are:

  • Feeling of being kicked or stabbed in the calf or ankle
  • Popping or snapping sensation
  • Swelling in the back of the leg between the heel and calf
  • Difficulty walking and rising up on the toes

Risk Factors

Men are at greater risk for Achilles tendon rupture due to their lack of flexibility compared to women. Runners with a previous history of Achilles tendonosis are also at greater risk.

Treatment

Most often Achilles tendon ruptures require surgery since the chance of re-rupture is great for those still planning to continue with their running career. For those who plan a more sedentary lifestyle or concerns about nerve damage or infection should choose a more conservative treatment route similar to those used to treat the other two Achilles tendon conditions.

Prevention

In addition to following all the previous recommendations stated earlier, runners who've a history of Achilles tendonosis should take great care to moderate their level of activity and watch out for irregularities in their running surface.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

For chronic heel pain, download our eBook, "Stop Living With Stubborn Heel Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
July 13, 2020
Category: foot conditions
Tags: top of foot pain  

women with top of foot pain on top of toesWhen we experience top of foot pain or pain in other parts of our feet, instead of pushing through it we need to stop and pay attention since pain is a clue something's not right.

Pain on the top of our feet can come from our bones, tendons, or joints. It can be a sign of injury or an underlying condition.

Here are the seven most common conditions causing top of foot pain.

Stress fractures

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline cracks in the bone caused by repetitive force on the feet and ankles or rapid increase in activity. They are more likely to develop in people with faulty foot mechanics such as flat feet or in women athletes who are low weight or post-menopausal.

Ignoring this top of foot pain can lead to a complete break in the foot. In addition to pain, people can experience swelling, redness, and bruising on the top of their feet. Treatment includes rest and immobilizing the foot. In addition, the MLS laser can accelerate healing.

Patients with faulty foot mechanics can help prevent a reoccurence of stress fractures by wearing custom orthotics.

Hammertoe, Claw, or Mallet Toes

Pain on top of the toes can be a sign of hammertoe, claw toe, or mallet toe. While slightly different, all three of these conditions are a result of a muscle and ligament imbalance around the middle or end toe joints. This imbalance causes the toe to have a clawed or hammer-like look about it. The top of the joint sticks up causing it to rub against shoes causing pain.

People with these conditions often inherit them, but they can also be caused by trauma, arthritis, and can worsen as a result of wearing tight shoes such as heels with a tight toe box. These conditions are progressive.

In addition to pain where the toe joint meet the shoe, patients can also experience pain in the ball of the foot at the base of the hammertoe, corns and calluses as a result of friction, inflammation, redness, burning sensations, swelling, and on some occasions open sores.

Conservative treatment can include orthotics, toe separators and splinting to realign toes, injections, padding to prevent rubbing, injections, and oral medication.

Surgery is usually required once the condition has progressed from flexible to rigid.

Bone Spurs

A bone spur growing out of a joint at the top of your foot is called a dorsal or tarsal boss. While most bone spurs are painless, when they occur in a location that causes friction or irritation with shoes they can be problematic. They're caused by excessive pressure on the bone during sports, by wearing poor fitting shoes, or through trauma and form as a result of the body trying to repair itself.

Treatment for top of foot pain caused by bone spurs primary involves reducing the irritation by wearing shoes to accommodate it and by trying alternative lacing methods to reduce the pressure. Anti-inflammatory medication, cortisone injections, and MLS laser treatments may also be helpful in pain reduction.

Lisfranc Injury

The Lisfranc ligament is a tough band of tissue that connects the metatarsal bones that lead to the toes to the tarsal bones in the middle of the top of the foot. A Lisfranc injury can occur through direct and indirect force to that area of the foot, such as a heavy object hitting the foot or a fall where the foot gets twisted. This type of injury occurs most frequently in runners, horseback riders, and football players.

Symptoms can include swelling, pain throughout the midfoot when standing or with pressure, bruising or blistering on the arch, and an inability to bear weight when this injury is severe.

To determine the extent of a Lisfranc injury, imaging will need to be done. Tearing of the tissues and ligaments are of most concern. Depending on the injury, treatment can involve immobilization of the foot, ice and elevation, and physical therapy.

Ganglion cyst

Ganglion cysts are soft, fluid-filled, benign (non-cancerous) lumps connected to tendons and joints and are often found on the top of the foot. Most cysts cause mild pain as a result of the pressure created by wearing shoes. However, when they enclose or press on a nerve, the pain can be intense.

The best way to prevent cysts from forming is to wear well-fitted, comfortable shoes and avoid repeated foot injuries. Ganglion cysts can be drained or injected with steroids but often come back. Surgical removal is an option to prevent reoccurence.

Hallux rigidus

Have you developed pain on the top of your big toe joint? You most likely have a form of degenerative arthritis called Hallux rigidus. As stated in the name, the toe becomes increasingly rigid as the condition worsens. An earlier stage of this condition is called Hallus limitus, as the movement of the toe is somewhat limited but not completely frozen as it can with its cousin. Hallux rigidus has several causes. It can develop as a result of overuse or injury from athletics or stubbing of the toe, an inherited foot type such as overpronation, or from an inflammatory disease condition such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout.

Besides experiencing pain upon walking, symptoms can include a bump on the top of the foot and swelling around the joint. In the early stages of Hallux rigidus, custom orthotics and rocker style shoes are used to control the motion and pain associated with this condition. It later stages when damage is more severe surgery is necessary.

Extensor tendonitis

Extensor tendonitis is a form of tendonitis that develops on the top of the foot where your tendons attach to your toes. It results from overuse or wearing shoes that are too tight during physical activity. Running uphill and downhill can be particularly problematic in the development of this condition. It is also commonly found in dancers, skiiers, and figure skaters.

Rest, applying ice, and anti-inflammatory medication can all help in reducing the inflammation from tendonitis. If foot imbalances are part of the reason for the tendonitis, orthotics can also help prevent it.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
July 06, 2020
Category: Heel pain
Tags: back of heel pain  

back of heel painTo relieve the stress of living in lockdown many of us have dramatically increased our level of exercise. Exercise is a fantastic outlet for reducing anxiety and improving our overall health. It can help reduce blood pressure, kick our metabolism into high gear, and help us sleep better.

Unfortunately a rapid increase in our mileage when walking or running can also lead to foot and ankle problems such as back of heel pain. If you've increased your exercise distance by more than 10-20% a week you're doing too much. Reducing your level of exercise may be all you need to relieve your pain.

However, an increase in exercise is only one factor in causing back of heel pain.

Low or Flat Arches

Your foot type can play a major role in developing foot pain. People who have flat feet or low arches are at greater risk for developing Achilles tendonitis one of several conditions that results in back of heel pain. The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. While it's able to withstand forces of 1,000 pounds or more, it can become inflamed.

Why?

People who have flat or low arches tend to roll their feet inwards or over pronate, increasing the pull on this tendon. People with this foot type also tend to develop a related condition--plantar fasciitis. Instead of feeling pain in the back of the heel, patients with this condition experience pain in the bottom of the heel.

Improper Footwear

Old, worn out, or poorly fitting athletic shoes can also increase the likelihood of developing Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. This is particularly true for patients who have flat feet or low arches. A person with this foot type often needs more supportive shoes to keep their feet stable and pain free.

Tight calf muscles

Another factor in development of back of heel pain are tight calf muscles or equinus. Tight calf muscles limit range of motion and make it much more likely for a person to roll inward or pronate causing strain and inflammation on the heel cord.

Other Types of Back of Heel Conditions

Other types of back of heel conditions can result from too much exercise or other factors.

Heel spurs
Heel spurs are osteophytes on the bottom or back of the calcaneus, or heel bone. These result from conditions such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis, in which additional stress is placed on the plantar fascia ligament or Achilles tendon.  The bone grows in response to the tight ligament or tendon as the micro-tears in these structures repair themselves. Heel spurs may not cause pain by themselves but may be associated with back of heel pain.

Bursitis

Bursitis occurs when the bursa located at the back of the heel becomes irritated and inflamed from excessive walking or running. Initially the fluid-filled sac develops as a protection from micro trauma that occurs from the repetitive movements, but eventually the sac also becomes inflamed leaving the person with bursitis.

A special type of bursitis can be caused by Haglund's deformity or "pump bump". The back of the heel bone or calcaneus enlarges as a result of wearing shoes that are too tight or stiff in the heel. This condition can also develop as a result of a tight Achilles tendon or having a high arched foot.

Insertional Pain of the Achilles Tendon

Insertional pain of the Achilles Tendon occurs at the site where the Achilles tendon inserts on the back of the heel bone. The tendon and its covering become inflamed, and a spur may form at the back of the heel. This condition is commonly caused by chronic overuse of the Achilles, a flatfoot deformity, or an acute injury.

Stress Fracture         

Athletes and others can also develop an overuse injury called a stress fracture on the back of the heel from a rapid increase in exercise. Stress fractures can also develop by changing the exercise surface (going from running on a soft track to concrete), poor running technique (i.e. compensating for a blister or bunion), and/or poor bone health (women who have low bone density due to menopause or low weight due to dieting or eating disorders).

Sever's Disease

Sever's disease is a condition that affects children between the ages of 8-14. Pain can be felt at the back or the bottom of the heel as a result of inflammation of the growth plate. Sever's disease or calcaneal apophysitis is most commonly experienced in youth athletes, particularly those involved in soccer, track, or basketball. Unlike adult heel pain it doesn't subside immediately once the activity stops.

Treatment for Back of Heel Pain

To treat and prevent back of heel pain it's important to properly diagnose the condition and the factors that contribute to it. The following modalities and suggestions are part of a comprehensive plan to resolve back of heel pain

Build Up Your Exercise Slowly
As mentioned earlier back of heel pain can result from rapid increases in exercise. Therefore it's best to increase your time and distance by no more than 10-20% per week. You’re much more likely to get a repetitive injury if you’re body and feet aren’t ready.

Curtailing Exercise

While limiting or reducing exercise may be enough to prevent or stop some back of heel pain, curtailing exercise altogether is necessary with a someone with a stress fractures or Sever's disease in order to heal.

Shopping for Shoes

The type of exercise you engage in should dictate the type of shoes you purchase. Supportive shoes designed for your sport can make a big difference in preventing back of heel pain and other painful foot conditions. Be sure to follow these tips when shopping for shoes:

  • Go to a reputable store - go to a store that specializes in the sport you engage in.
  • Replace the insert that comes with your athletic shoes with an over-the-counter insert like Powerstep.
  • Go shopping later in the day when feet are more likely to swell.
  • Get your feet measured and buy shoes to fit your larger foot.
  • Test your shoes for stability - shoes should bend at the toe not in the center, be difficult to twist when you try to wring them out like a rag, and have a stiff heel counter that you can’t move easily.
  • Replace worn out shoes every 500 miles.

Stretching for Tight Calf Muscles

While everyone should stretch before engaging in exercise, this is essential for people with tight calf muscles. For many people standing stretches may be sufficient, but for those with very tight calf muscles I recommend using an Achilles splint for 30 mins during the day while watching television or reading a book. This needs to be done daily for a least three weeks.

Custom Orthotics

To resolve and prevent flare ups of most back of heel pain, custom orthotics are often necessary. This is particular true for those with a diagnosis of Achilles tendonitis and if your back of heel pain is worse because you have flat feet or low arches. Custom orthotics will correct faulty foot mechanics and relieve pressure from the Achilles tendon.

Light Laser Treatments       

MLS laser and other light lasers can greatly help reduce back of heel inflammation and pain. The MLS laser uses dual wavelengths of infrared light to penetrate deep into the tissue and stimulate regeneration at the cellular level. Patients often experience relief with as few as 2-3 treatments.

Restarting Exercise

As with any inflammatory condition, a return to exercise must be gradual.

If you're experiencing back of heel pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
May 21, 2020
Category: Heel pain
Tags: barefoot  

You're stuck at home. If you're like many people, you've been walking more. Perhaps you've also started working out at home. As a result, you may be wondering if it's OK to work out barefoot or in stocking feet.

The answer is, it depends. If you've been Zooming into a yoga or Pilates class your fine. These forms of exercise are low impact.

But recently patients have been coming in with foot pain as a result of doing higher impact workouts at home while barefoot. Heel pain, Achilles tendonitis, and other foot problems can result when additional pressure is added to the plantar fascia--the thick band of tissue which originates at the heel, travels across the arches, and inserts into the base of the toes.

When you go barefoot your feet don't have the support they need to withstand the higher pressure placed on them.

When doing higher impact activities it's important to wear athletic shoes designed for that exercise. Be sure you're shoes aren't showing signs of wear. Also, shoes should only bend at the toes, not in the middle, be hard to wring out like a rag, and have a firm heel counter. To learn more about buying supportive shoes, view this video on how to test your shoes.

If you're experiencing foot pain call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

For chronic heel pain, download our eBook, "Stop Living With Stubborn Heel Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Wikimedia Commons Nicole Kidman is a trouper. While husband Keith Urban was doing a surprise benefit concert in support of frontline workers in Tennessee she showed up all smiles while donning a walking boot. Turns out she was running around her neighborhood and didn't see a pothole.  She rolled her ankle and ended up breaking it. 

You might think foot and ankle injuries occur most often in the young and the restless or athletes. But just as often, hanging out at home can be just as hazardous. One of the most common dangers is slamming your toe into a dresser or other hard object in the middle of the night.

But there are many other hazards in the home and backyard which can lead to a broken ankle an other foot injuries. Now that you're home more, scanning your house and yard for tripping dangers will help prevent a broken ankle or worse.

Here are my recommendations:

  • Don't go barefoot - as much as you might want to kick off your shoes while cleaning up your yard or gardening, don't do it. Lack of foot support can lead to trip, fall, and twisted ankle.  It's best to wear tennis shoes or a clog like Oofos (which can also be helpful for people with heel pain) when in the garden.    
  • Check your shoes to wear - turn your tennis shoes over. Do you see any uneven wear? If so, it's time to buy a new pair.  Worn out shoes do not provide good support.
  • Always wear closed toed shoes when mowing your lawn.
  • Check your yard for stray hoses, fallen tree limbs, and divots. 
  • Remove clutter from your home - now is a great time to clean up the areas of your home that are potential fall hazards.  In particular, remove any objects on the floor.
  • Check area rugs to ensure edges can't come up and that there's non-slip backing.
  • Coil or tape cords and wires next to the wall. If needed, have an electrician install another outlet.
  • Install a night light so you can see where you're going in the middle of the night.

What To Do If You Think Your Ankle Is Broken

So you've fallen and your ankle is killing you. Should you go see your podiatrist or doctor? The short answer is yes, if you want to make sure it's not broken. It's almost impossible to tell without an X-ray if your ankle is broken or sprained. The truth is that a sprain can take much longer to heal than a fracture or break.

Whatever you decide to do, it's important to take action right away to keep down the inflammation, swelling and pain you'll experience with either situation. We recommend using the RICE protocol to accomplish this. RICE stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.

  • Rest - stop all physical activity and don't put any weight on the affected ankle.
  • Ice - apply an ice pack to the affected area (with a layer of cloth between your skin and the ice), 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off.
  • Compression - use an elastic or Ace bandage to provide compression to the area.
  • Elevate - keep the ankle elevated as much as possible.

If the affected ankle isn't healing after a week or so, please make an appointment with our office. In addition to an X-ray, an MRI may be required to assess damage to the underlying soft tissue.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

We are now offering telemedicine in addition to in person appointments.

For more information about foot and ankle problems, download our eBook, "No More Foot Pain".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Photo credit: Wikimedia, Georges Biard





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