Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: running

By Dr. Rion Berg
January 23, 2019
Category: foot conditions

Running in the rain may be a no-brainer for you web-footed runners out there, but when the weather gets into the 30s it may be time to brush up on how to stay toasty.

Dress Appropriately for the Weather
While you'll warm up and get hotter the longer you run, you'll still want to avoid shorts to prevent hypothermia. At the same time you'll need to avoid bundling up too much so you won't get overheated.

It's important to strike the right balance by wearing clothes that will keep you warm enough and wick away moisture from your body at the same time.

Some suggestions:

Choose Your Footgear Wisely

  • Wear trail shoes rather than your usual running shoes to give you more grip particularly if the cold weather turns condition snowy.

  • Socks such as Smartwool Women's Cold Weather Crew or another sock that wicks away moisture are also an essential addition. Even if your feet get wet you'll still stay warm.

Stay Safe

  • Run during the day and/or wear a running vest or strobe light at night.

  • A shorter running stride can prevent you from slipping and falling.

  • Keep hydrated. Your body will require just as much water as if you were running in the summer.

Of course if you need a brush up on what to wear in rainy weather check out my previous blog, "The Art of Running Safely in the Rain"

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
May 11, 2018
Category: Heel pain

Just about this time of year my office starts to fill up with patients who decide to take up running to get in shape, lose weight, or challenge themselves by racing. Although I love taking care of people, I'd rather make sure they don't get injured in the first place.

Running is definitely an injury-prone sport. Fortunately there are lots of things you can do to prevent running injuries this summer. Here are 8 sure fire hacks that will greatly reduce your risk of a running injury or foot problem like plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, or an ingrown toenail.

Start Slowly

If you're new to running or you've run in the past but haven't for a while, it's important to start slowly. Even if you lay off running for a few weeks, research shows the bodies' tolerance diminishes during that short time. Instead of returning to your usual five miles a day, take it easy.

Start off running for 10-15 minutes at a time and increase by 10% a week. That way your chance of a foot injury is far less.

Stop Running If Your Feet Hurt
Although it should go without saying, it always amazes me how many people just assume that pain is a good thing. I think it comes from that saying "no pain, no gain". When it comes to foot pain if you feel pain, you won't gain. You'll only lose and end up with an injury. So stop running when your feet or any part of your body starts to hurt.

Make Sure Your Shoes Fit and Aren't Worn Out

Wear the Right Socks

Although you won't get heel pain or Achilles tendonitis from wearing cotton socks you will get some nasty blisters. Avoid cotton and buy socks made out of synthetic materials that wick away moisture.

Do Proper Stretching

We've all heard that we need to stretch before we run, but most of us don't do it for long enough or correctly. A simple calf stretch done for a minute or less is usually not enough for most people to really make much difference. If you are prone to heel pain or Achilles tendonitis, tight calf muscles are frequently part of the problem. I recommend my patients who already have heel pain or are prone to it use an Achilles splint for 30 minutes a day to stretch their calves.

Dynamic warm-ups are also important to get your body ready for running. Some evidence shows that doing a static stretch right before running can inhibit performance.

Avoid High Heels

Frequent wear of high heels leads to shortened calf muscles. Tight calf muscles are often a big factor in bringing on plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. If you plan to wear high heels and also run, try to avoid going directly from heels to running.

Change Up Your Exercise

Rather than run every day, go swimming, do yoga, or another aerobic activity. Changing up your exercise will make you less prone to injury. Also, a strong core can help you recover more easily after tripping on a rock or other object in the road.

Eat A Healthy Diet

Staying hydrated and eating a healthy diet are also important for preventing injuries. You're less likely to lose steam and turn an ankle. Also, women who are too thin or are post-menopausal are at greater risk for stress fractures.

If you feel pain while running, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Yesterday Frank Mason of the Sacramento Kings was sidelined from basketball due to a plantar fascia tear. Named player of the year in 2017, Mason will be out for at least a month as he heals. Although I see plenty of patients in my office with plantar fasciitis, plantar fascial tears or ruptures occur more frequently in patients who are athletes. Basketball players are at particular risk due to the extreme jumps that players make.

Should you be concerned about a tear?

While it's much more likely you'll suffer from plantar fasciitis if you have flat feet, tight calf muscles, or other risk factors you could experience a tear or rupture if you participate in high impact sports or exercise such as running, gymnastics, or soccer.

The best offense when it comes to preventing plantar fasciitis or a plantar fascia tear is to wear specific shoes for your sport, doing sufficient warm-ups and stretching before you participate, and correcting any faulty foot mechanics you may have i.e. flat feet.

Proper Footgear
Every sport has footgear that is made to enhance your ability to perform your best. Specialized footwear is also designed to prevent foot and ankle injuries. Playing a sport in the wrong footgear or in worn out footgear leaves runners and other sports players open to injury. At the start of the New Year it's always best to flip over your footgear to see if they're worn down. Runners should purchase new footgear every 500 miles.

Warm-ups and Stretching
The plantar fascia can more easily rupture or develop micro-tears (heel pain) without proper warm-ups and stretching. Athletes with tight calf muscles will need to be particularly diligent about stretching. I recommend Dynamic Warm-Ups and stretching each calf muscle for at least five minutes.

Inserts and Custom Orthotics
Athletes and other people with low arches, flat feet, or have feet that pronate will very likely need custom orthotics to prevent plantar fasciitis and plantar tears. If your heel pain is mild you can try inserts such as Powersteps first. If they work, great. If not, you'll need to see a podiatrist to get custom orthotics.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
February 06, 2017
Category: sports injuries
Tags: running  

As a runner you very likely peeked out your window today to see how much it snowed overnight.  Your first thought might have been how bad will the traffic be?  But your second thought was probably how will the snow affect my run?

Of course many of you may have given up on that idea and are planning to head to the gym after work, but for those hardy souls that want to experience the winter wonderland here are some tips for running outdoors and staying safe at the same time.

Last year I wrote a blog on the "The Art of Running Safely in the Rain". Certain aspects of that blog still apply to running in snowy weather, but there are a lot of other things to keep in mind when you throw snow into the mix.

Dress Appropriately for the Weather
Although we're unlikely to have weather in the 20s if it's snowing you know it's going to be at least 32 degrees outside. While you'll warm up and get hotter the longer you run, you'll still want to avoid shorts to prevent hypothermia. At the same time you'll need to avoid bundling up too much so you won't get overheated. It's important to strike the right balance by wearing clothes that will keep you warm enough and wick away moisture from your body at the same time.

Some suggestions:

Choose Your Footgear Wisely

  • Wear trail shoes rather than your usual running shoes to give you more grip.

  • Lots of snow means you're going to need extra traction for your feet. Yaktrax are specially designed to keep you going

  • Socks such as SmartWool Trekking Heavy Crew Socks (Gray) Large or another sock that wicks away moisture are also an essential addition. Even if your feet get wet you'll still stay warm.

  • Since our snow tends to be wetter in the lowlands avoid the slush and puddles that are very likely to form on the streets.

Stay Safe

  • Run during the day and/or wear a running vest or strobe light at night.

  • A shorter running stride can prevent you from slipping and falling.

  • Keep hydrated. Your body will require just as much water as if you were running in the summer.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

  • Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

  • Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

  • Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
April 11, 2016
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: running   plantar fasciitis   heel pian  

Did you feel like you stepped on a razor blade when you got out of bed in the morning? You wonder if this could be that nasty heel pain you've heard your running buddies talk about. Concerned that this could sideline you from your summer race schedule?

Stop worrying.

It's very likely that you do have heel pain or plantar fasciitis. As a Seattle foot doctor with over 30 years of experience I want to put your mind at ease. This condition is common in people who run. I see athletes like you all the time and I'm able to get them out of pain, fast.

At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City, we can help you by using a combination of the five steps below.

Reduce your inflammation

Every patient we see with plantar fasciitis has inflammation. It's a natural response to the injury of the tissue in your heel and it's what's causing the pain. To reduce the pain  temporarily reduce your activity, apply ice daily, and use anti-inflammatory medications. In my office I can give you a steroid injection or tape your feet for immediate relief.

Reduce your calf tightness

Your calf is connected to the plantar fascia which is the tissue that is causing you all the pain. If you have tight calves this is always a big player in the cause of your heel pain. When calves are tight they pull on the fascia every time you pound the ground. If this is the case for you, we'll provide you with all the necessary tools to reduce it.

Address your wonky foot mechanics

Most feet aren't perfect -- yours probably aren't either. If you're a pronator (your feet rotate in) or a supinator (your feet rotate out) we can improve your foot mechanics and help heal and prevent further bouts of plantar fasciitis.

Teach you about proper shoe gear
Wearing the right shoes is often half the battle. Check out our video.

Send you to physical therapy to get you better, fast.

Don't miss out on that upcoming race.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+