What's Causing Your Ball of Foot Pain?
By Dr. Rion Berg
February 08, 2018
Category: Neuroma

Have you developed pain in the ball of your foot? Many of my patients tell me their pain has come on suddenly and they weren't necessarily engaging in any physical activity such as running or hiking. 

Ball of foot pain occurs where the toe bones join the metatarsal bones. It can occur in one spot or all across the ball of the foot. Most commonly it's localized to one area. There are many causes of ball of foot pain, but the first step is evaluating the foot to determine where it is and whether any specific activities have contributed to it.

Some things that can cause ball of foot pain are:

  • Athletic activities

  • Amount of time you're on your feet

  • Types of shoes you're wearing

  • Mechanical instability of the foot

  • Tight calf muscles

Once we establish the diagnosis we can apply a treatment that will relieve your pain immediately. Following this we can design a treatment plan designed to prevent reoccurence of your ball of the foot pain.

Remember pain in the foot in not normal. Early evaluation and treatment can help resolve your ball of foot pain.

Other Resources
Neuroma
Metatarsalgia
Sesamoiditis

If you have ball of foot pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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