Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: diabetes

By Dr. Rion Berg
November 23, 2020
Category: diabetes
Tags: diabetes   gout   Thanksgiving  

food being deliveredFor most of us Thanksgiving is all about food. Each year we look forward to eating our favorites  including turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie. But for many of us Thanksgiving is filled with many pitfalls, particularly if we have diabetes or gout.  Eating the wrong thing or too much of our favorites can elevate our blood sugar or cause foot pain.

This year we have the added problem of a pandemic.  While we might normally be able to ask our families to cook special treats to meet our dietary needs, this year there is already a lot of stress and strain on everyone. We may not want to bother those who are already going out of their way by making special home deliveries during Covid.

If you are doing the preparation and you have people with these health conditions in your family it doesn't need to take more effort, just more forethought.  If you're the one with diabetes or gout, there are some steps you can take to avoid pushing your health into the red zone this holiday season.

Making Healthier Turkey

While turkey is usually a healthy food for anyone, there are ways to make it healthier. Try this turkey recipe by Eating Well to benefit those who want to reduce their fat and salt intake.

Limit Foods that Contain Purines

Foods with purines can cause those prone to gout to experience pain, particularly in their big toes. It's not the purines themselves that are the problem but the uric acid they turn into to.  Foods high in purine are: mussels, scallops and tuna, red meat, and liver. Drinks with high levels of purines are red wine and beer and drinks containing fructose.  Drinking lots of water can help flush the uric acid from your system.

Cut Back on Sugar

Most of us eat way more sugar then we need to make our food taste good. Many of our Thanksgiving foods are full of them. Consider the classic yam dish with marshmallows on top. Yams already contain sugar which is what makes them super delicious. If you want to make them special without the added sugar, add spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. You may also consider substituting white sugar with Splenda or Stevia, both better options for people with diabetes.

Choose Your Carbs Wisely

Besides turkey, most of us relish eating mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, dressing, and gravy. Carbs can be a minefield for someone with diabetes. Eating too much of them can lead to a sharp increase in blood sugar.

You have a couple of choices this Thanksgiving. Either you can eat small amounts of each of your favorite foods or decide upfront which foods are a must have.  Then ask your host to only deliver those foods. Another idea is to apportion these favorites out over several days.

Eat Ahead of Time

One way to moderate how much you eat on Thanksgiving is to eat ahead of time. Don't skip breakfast. Instead make your morning meal one with protein like eggs instead of having your usual coffee and toast. Protein is more satisfying and lasts longer in the body.

If you're a diabetic or experiencing foot pain due to gout, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

 

 

On brilliantly, beautiful days like today we all crave spending more time outside before the rain sets in for months on end. For most of us going out for a stroll in a park is no big deal, but for older adults and people with diabetes walking can lead to falls--in fact 25% of older adults fall each year. For people with diabetes the annual incidence rises to 39%.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) many problems can lead to increased fall risk for those over 65.

  • Problems with balance

  • Use of medications that can interfere with balance such as tranquilizers, sedatives, or anti-depressants.

  • Problems with vision

  • Foot pain or improper foot wear

  • Lower body weakness

  • Vitamin D deficiency

People with diabetes particularly those with peripheral neuropathy have additional fall risks including:

  • Decreased or no sensation in the feet

  • Impaired sweat and oil production which can place abnormal pressure on the bones and joints when walking

  • Muscle weakness

  • Painful foot problems such as bunions or hammertoe can cause pain that makes walking difficult.

    At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City, Dr. Rion Berg specializes in treating patients with diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. We also offer a special "In Balance Fall Prevention Program". Even if you don't have diabetes, if you're over 65 and experiencing foot problems there is a lot that can be done to reduce or eliminate your pain so you can continue to enjoy the bright sunny days while they're still here.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
April 26, 2016
Category: diabetes
Tags: diabetes  

Phillip the Duck was pretty unlucky when his feet got frostbitten and he wasn't able to function very well. Fortunately, Phillip became a lucky duck when his owner turned to a middle school teacher who happened to have a 3D printer. Phillip received his new feet and now he's doing just fine.

Although we have entered an age where prosthetics for feet and legs are becoming more common, no one would want to lose a foot or foot function if they could avoid it.

As a Seattle foot doctor I work with diabetic patients to encourage them to check their feet on a daily basis to avoid developing foot ulcers which can lead to amputation. In diabetes, foot ulcers form due to reduced blood flow to the feet and nerve damage due to peripheral neuropathy. Nerve damage results in reduced sensation in the feet and the inability to sense minor cuts and blisters that can easily turn into ulcers.

Our focus at the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City is to help our diabetic patients early in the process by helping them prevent ulcers from forming. If ulcers do form we work with our patients to heal the ulcers to prevent limb loss.

If you have diabetes in addition to checking your feet on a daily basis for cuts, sores, or bruises, I recommend the following:

  • Wear thick sock without seams

  • Obtain shoes that fit properly; specific diabetic shoes are the best

  • Avoid going barefoot, period

  • Exercise daily to improve your circulation

  • Come in for an annual Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Exam

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

By Dr. Rion Berg
November 12, 2015
Category: diabetes

As the holidays draw near, most of us start salivating at the mere thought of eating some of our favorite foods. However, if you have diabetes or weight issues the holiday can be a minefield when it comes to navigating your way around the  Thanksgiving table.

Fortunately there are ways to enjoy the holiday without overindulging by following these simple tips.

Eat Ahead of Time
Although it may seem logical to skip breakfast on Thanksgiving Day, the experts say that eating a small meal earlier in the day can help you control your desire to over eat later on. Eat a breakfast with protein like eggs instead of having your usual coffee and toast. Protein will last longer in your body and you won't be starving when you arrive at the dinner table.

Consider The Ingredients
You may be hosting Thanksgiving or bringing a dish to share--either way there are ways you can choose ingredients that will be healthier for you and the guests.

  • Cut back on sugar - many recipes for Thanksgiving are loaded with sugar. Consider the classic yam dish with marshmallows on top. Yams already contain sugar which is what makes them super delicious. If you want to add zest to them, add spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. Consider substituting white sugar with maple syrup or honey.
  • Use fat free chicken broth to baste the turkey and as the base for gravy
  • Skip the butter when serving mashed potatoes. Try using Yukon gold or red skinned potatoes. Because of their smooth and buttery nature they taste great without it.

Change Up Your Plates To Cut Calories
It's been shown that people will choose less food if their plate size is smaller. If you're hosting let your guests choose their plate size. If your celebrating somewhere else ask the person hosting to provide you with a smaller plate.

Choose Must Have Foods Only
Instead of scrambling to get everything on your plate--take a deep breath, look around the table, and take only your must haves. For example, rolls are almost always a staple at Thanksgiving but so is stuffing. If you know you must have stuffing to feel like you've really celebrated, pass up the rolls.

Savor The Food And The Experience
Because most of us eat so quickly, we don't realize we're full until we've already eaten too much. Put down your fork after each bite and actually taste the delicious food you just put in your mouth. Enjoy the company in addition to the food and you'll eat more slowly.

If you're experiencing foot pain or diabetes and need to see a podiatrist, call the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

By Dr. Rion Berg
October 16, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: diabetes   MRSA  

As we watch the news and learn about the career ending MRSA infection acquired by Daniel Fells of the NY Giants, it's scary to consider that your kid may be vulnerable to this potentially life threatening bacteria. As a podiatrist who has treated many wounds and saved limbs, I wanted to let you know about the things you can do to keep your young athlete safe.

First, what is MRSA?

MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant staph aureus. Methicillin was the antibiotic used to treat staph aureus in the past but now this new form is resistant to it making it much more difficult to treat and more dangerous to the person who gets it. MRSA is highly contagious and can be easily transmitted through body contact which is one of the reasons athletes in high contact sports such as football, basketball, and soccer need to be educated about it.

Fortunately there are specific symptoms for young athletes and their parents to watch for and specific things that can be done to prevent it.

Symptoms of MRSA

The symptoms of MRSA include:

  • Swollen, painful, red bumps

  • Heat or warmth

  • Pus or drainage from a wound

  • More advanced signs are fever, chills, body aches, rash, or shortness of breath and can mean the infection has entered the bloodstream (be aware that some of these symptoms mimic the flu)

Prevention of MRSA in Young Athletes

  • Good hand hygiene is extremely important. Kids should wash their hands before and after workouts and practice.

  • Scrapes, cuts, and injuries should be washed thoroughly and bandaged.

  • Kids should not share soap, towels, or razors.

  • Athletes need to shower immediately after practice.

  • Athletic equipment should be wiped down before and after use

If someone you know shows these signs and symptoms, contact your primary care physician immediately or call 911 if symptoms have advanced.

Does a loved one have diabetes and an ulcer that is not going away? Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.