Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: neuroma

By Dr. Rion Berg
February 08, 2018
Category: Neuroma

Have you developed pain in the ball of your foot? Many of my patients tell me their pain has come on suddenly and they weren't necessarily engaging in any physical activity such as running or hiking. 

Ball of foot pain occurs where the toe bones join the metatarsal bones. It can occur in one spot or all across the ball of the foot. Most commonly it's localized to one area. There are many causes of ball of foot pain, but the first step is evaluating the foot to determine where it is and whether any specific activities have contributed to it.

Some things that can cause ball of foot pain are:

  • Athletic activities

  • Amount of time you're on your feet

  • Types of shoes you're wearing

  • Mechanical instability of the foot

  • Tight calf muscles

Once we establish the diagnosis we can apply a treatment that will relieve your pain immediately. Following this we can design a treatment plan designed to prevent reoccurence of your ball of the foot pain.

Remember pain in the foot in not normal. Early evaluation and treatment can help resolve your ball of foot pain.

Other Resources
Neuroma
Metatarsalgia
Sesamoiditis

If you have ball of foot pain, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
September 14, 2017
Category: Bunions
Tags: hammertoes   neuroma  

After hanging out all summer in sandals, some women cringe at the thought of going back to close-toed shoes. While most women look forward to shopping for new shoes, for women with foot problems new kicks are the last thing on their mind.

Here are the three most common foot problems that make particular closed-toed shoes a problem.

Bunions
While you can have bunions when you're young, most women develop bunions as they age. Faulty foot mechanics (e.g. flat feet) and bad habits such as wearing high heels, pointy-toed shoes, or shoes that are too tight take their toll over time. Bunions don't form overnight, but after many years of putting more weight on the ball of the foot will cause them to progress.

The important thing is to catch them early so that they don't get worse. Choose shoes with heels once inch or lower that provide wiggle room in the toe box.

Hammertoes
Hammertoes affect the joints of the baby toes by bending abnormally. Toes look like an upside down "V" and cause pain when rubbing up against the top of shoes, ball of foot pain at the base of the hammertoe, and corns and calluses between the toes.

My shoe advice is the same as for bunions. In addition, look for shoes with more depth in the toe box so toes don't rub against the top of the shoe.

Morton's Neuroma
Women experiencing burning, numbness, or tingling in the ball of the foot and most often between the 3rd and 4th toes most likely have Morton's neuroma. Again, wearing shoes with a wider toe box and avoiding high heels are essential to prevent aggravating this condition.

For more information about shoes with a wider toe box, check out Barking Dog Shoes. Check out each of the links above for treatment information.

For more information about treatment for these conditions, visit each of the links above.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", sent by email.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
September 26, 2014
Category: Heel pain

New runners are often anxious to just get out there and hit the jogging trail. Weight loss and getting in shape are frequently cited reasons for wanting to start a running program. Like most physicians, I’m thrilled when my patients want to start exercising but I’m also want to make sure my patients are aware of potential foot and ankle problems when they take up a new sport.

Heel Pain

If you notice pain in the morning as soon as your feet touch the ground, you probably have plantar fasciitis, a very common condition among new runners and seasoned runners. The plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue that runs from the heel and inserts into the base of the toes. Running can cause this band to stretch beyond its capacity causing inflammation and pain. This occurs commonly in runners who have faulty foot mechanics and/or tight calf muscles.

Neuromas

Neuromas are most common in women runners but men can also develop them. They most commonly occur between the 3rdand 4thtoes and are caused by high heel use or narrow shoes. Pain can be alleviated by use of pads and ultrasound guided injections.

Achilles tendonitis

As a new runner you might experience Achilles tendonitis particularly if you are overzealous in your training and don’t do proper warmup and stretching. Improper footwear and overpronation also increase risk of this condition. Rest, icing, and use of anti-inflammatory medications are used initially and then assessment of the situation by a podiatrist will determine how to prevent this condition from reoccurring.

Ankle sprains

Often new runners are trying out a variety of running surfaces to see what works best. They make the mistake of running on uneven ground where turning an ankle is more likely. Don’t ignore a sprained ankle. Sprains can be just as bad as a break and can take longer to heal. Use the RICE protocol until you can get in to be seen by a podiatrist.

For more information about starting a new running program or treating an existing foot or ankle condition the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City can be reached at 206-368-7000 or you may request an appointment online.