Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: turf toe

You get up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom and you accidentally slam your big toe into your dresser. Yikes!

You are not alone. We've all done it. Hundreds of patients a year come in to see me with a stubbed toe. Although seeking medical attention for something as common as a stubbed toe may seem strange, it's best to come in to be sure the toe isn't fractured or infected if swelling or bleeding occurs.

In addition to a stubbed toe there are six other reasons why your big toe is killing you.

Ingrown Toenail
An ingrown toenail is another extremely common cause of big toe pain. Family history, trauma, short shoes, and improperly cut toenails can all lead to an ingrown big toenail. Fortunately surgery can be done right in the podiatry office. Most patients feel little pain and can start their usual activities the next day. Our office sees a lot of kids with ingrown toenails. To help prevent it, make sure your kids aren't outgrowing their shoes. Adults need to make sure to cut their toenails straight across only.

Turf Toe
Turf toe most often occurs in athletes. It's very common in football kickers but can occur in any game where players jam their toe or repeatedly push off during running and jumping. The term was originally coined with sports played on artificial turf; the harder artificial surface makes cleats more likely to stick. However, turf toe can also occur on grass surfaces, particularly when the shoe worn is not supportive.

Tennis toe
Tennis has its own specific toe injury caused by the fast changes in direction and the toe pushing against the toe box. Damage can result in the area underneath the toenail. It often gets worse with time. Preventing this injury is very straightforward. If you play tennis, keep your toenails short and wear tennis shoes that fit.

Sesamoiditis
This is an overuse injury involving chronic inflammation of the sesamoid bones and the tendons involved with those bones. The sesamoids are two pea-shaped bones located in the ball of the foot, beneath the big toe joint. Sesamoiditis is caused by increased pressure to the sesamoids frequently seen in ballet dancers, runners, and baseball catchers. People with high arches who wear high heels are also at risk.

Hallux limitus and rigidus
Hallux stands for big toe. You might guess from the names that limitus means "limited movement" and rigidus means "a rigid, inflexible toe". Both of these conditions can be quite painful since we use our big toes for all of our mobile activities.

Usually a person with this condition starts out with hallux limitus which can progress  to hallux rigidus. Both are forms of degenerative arthritis and can be inherited but can also develop from trauma to the big toe. Early treatment is important to prevent it from getting to the rigid stage. Wearing orthotics, anti-inflammatory treatments, and rocker bottom shoes are all effective treatments.

Gout
Gout is caused by a buildup of uric acid (a normal byproduct of the diet) in the joints. The big toe joint is most commonly affected, very likely from the pressure during walking and because uric acid crystals build up in the coolest part of the body. Attacks of gout are extremely painful and can be triggered by diets high in purines such as those found in red meat, organ meats like liver and kidney, shellfish, red wine and beer. Avoiding these foods and certain medications and drinking plenty of water are the best ways to avoid this condition.

If you have pain in your big toe, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

Your free foot book "No More Foot Pain" is waiting to be sent to your home.

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
December 14, 2016
Category: sports injuries
Tags: turf toe   fractures  

Your big toe is killing you. You know you've been doing a lot of running around lately to buy gifts for the family or maybe you played some pickup basketball yesterday at the gym. You're not exactly sure when it happened or how it happened but it's been throbbing away ever since yesterday. You've taken some ibuprofen and iced it, but it still hurts and you want to know what's going on.

There's a good chance you've injured your sesamoids.

What? I know it's a strange name.

Your sesamoids are the medical term for the two bones beneath the big toe that act as a pulley for the tendons they're imbedded in. They allow the tendons to easily slide and absorb weight when you walk, jump, or run.

There are 3 types of injuries to the sesamoids:

Turf toe
A turf toe is a sprain to the ligaments around the big toe joint. Turf toe may also result in an injury to the soft tissue attached to the sesamoid or a fracture of the sesamoid. Those most at risk are football players (notably kickers like Seahawks Steven Hauschka), runners, and dancers.

Sesamoiditis
Typically caused by an overuse injury by athletes, sesamoiditis is an inflammation of the tendons and surrounding tissue. In this case, pain can develop gradually. With a fracture the pain will be immediate. You can have a hard time bending and straightening the big toe. Although swelling and bruising often come with sesamoiditis, this is not always the case.

Fractures
As mentioned above the pain with a fracture will be immediate and will take some time to heal. However, with chronic sesamoid fractures the pain may come and go depending on activities. You don't have to be an athlete to fracture your toe. It's not uncommon for podiatrists to see patients who have jammed their toe into a piece of furniture in the middle of the night.

If you've experienced any of these symptoms, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. Often same day for emergencies and less than 2 weeks for chronic foot pain. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

By Dr. Rion Berg
December 19, 2014
Category: sports injuries
Tags: broken toe   turf toe   sesamoiditis  

I don’t know what it is about the holidays and end of year, but for some reason a lot of patients call us because they broke their hallux or great toe. Just this past week one patient, ready to leave for a ski vacation, broke her toe by kicking her bed. Another patient broke his toe tripping up some steps. Other people are rushing around at this time of year buying, wrapping gifts, cooking and inadvertently run into a hard object. Throughout the year broken toes are often the result of people walking barefoot at night and end up kicking all kinds of objects lying around their house. Heavy objects falling on your tootsies can also cause a fracture.

You would think, a broken toe is no big deal, right? Sometimes. If the injury is mild, rest, taping the great toe to your other toe, or wearing a hiking boot or walking boot may work just fine. However, if  a more severe fracture is neglected it may not heal properly leading to complications such as arthritis. Surgery is sometimes required.

Turf toe and sesamoiditis are other toe injuries that occur most often during individual and team sports.

Do yourself a favor if you jamb your toe into a door, bed, or other hard object come to the office and Dr. Rion Berg will do an examination, X-rays, and then provide you a treatment plan that will work for you.

Make an appointment by calling us at 206-368-7000 or request an appointment online.

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
June 12, 2014
Category: sports injuries

Hello soccer fans! I’m sure you’ll have your nose close to your TV tonight as you watch the FIFA World Cup 2014 opening ceremony. The whole world will be watching as Brazil faces off against Croatia at the Itaquera stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Although knee injuries are certainly common and have plagued several top ranked world cup players, these soccer players are also at risk for foot injuries, particularly those involving the toes. My job as your Seattle podiatrist is to make sure that if you or your young soccer player sustains a toe injury that we can get you healed and back to playing as soon as possible.

One of the more common injuries in soccer and regular American football is a condition call turf toe. Turf toe is a sprain of the big toe joint that occurs when the toe jams into something or when players push off frequently during running or jumping. Players in the world cup will be most at risk for this injury because they’ll be playing on artificial turf which is where the term “turf toe” got its name.

Signs and symptoms include pain, swelling, and limited joint movement. When turf toe is caused by repetitive action, symptoms begin slowly and get worse over time. When a direct injury causes damage to the bone then symptoms can accelerate within 24 hours. Soccers players with flat feet are also at greater risk for developing this condition. Rest, icing, elevation, and taping to compress the toe and reduce movement are all immediate actions you can take on your own.

For complete diagnosis, patients will need an X-ray to determine how bad the injury is and whether further attention is needed.

To prevent this condition from reoccurring, avoid playing on artificial turf and if you have flat feet you will need to be assessed to determine if this foot type is exacerbating your risk of injury.

If you or a loved one has sustained this type of injury, you can contact the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City at 206-368-7000 or reach us at www.bergdpm.com.