Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for: August, 2015

By Dr. Rion Berg
August 28, 2015
Category: diabetes
Tags: gluten-free  

As a diabetic you already know that that counting carbs or creating your plate is just part of what you need to do to maintain appropriate blood sugar levels. Recently your doctor told you that avoiding gluten contained in wheat, other grains, and products is also important for your particular health situation.

If you have Type 1 diabetes you're 10% more likely to have celiac disease than the general population. Those with celiac disease need to completely avoid gluten containing products as they damage the small intestine. If you have Type 2 diabetes, you're more likely to be gluten intolerant (only 1% of the general population has celiac disease). Gluten intolerance means you may have discomfort when eating products containing gluten, but you won't damage your small intestines.

Regardless if you've decided for your health that you need to cut out gluten, there is great information available through the American Diabetes Association including a Gluten-Free Recipe Book for People with Diabetes. As a Seattle podiatrist and the Chief Podiatrist of the Wound Care Center at Northwest Hospital, I want to do everything I can to support my diabetic patients.

So in addition, I've modified a recipe from Diabetic Living Online, another great source for Gluten-free diabetic recipes. With the abundance of tomatoes right now, this recipe will help you use them up.

Baked Tomato and Zucchini

  • 1/2 cup of green beans (fresh or frozen)
     

  • 8 ounces fresh zucchini, washed and cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
     

  • 4 medium tomatoes, chopped
     

  • 1 medium onion, sliced and separated into rings
     

  • 1/2 of a medium yellow or green sweet pepper, seeded and cut into thin strips
     

  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
     

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
     

    Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cook string beans in boiling water until slightly done or zap in the microwave for 30 secs. In a 2-quart casserole, combine string beans, zucchini, tomatoes, onion, sweet pepper, crushed red pepper, and salt.
  2. Bake, covered, for 45 minutes; stir. Bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes more; stir. Serve with a slotted spoon. Makes 6 (2/3-cup) servings.

For more information about diabetes check out these articles:

Diabetic Patients with Fungal Toenails
Diabetic Foot Care Guidelines
Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
92 Year Old Woman Marathoner Inspires Us to Exercise

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
August 27, 2015
Category: diabetes
Tags: diabetes   ulcers  

Project Runway Supermodel Heidi Klum and fashion designer Zac Posen wandered off to a beach this past week and stepped on the same rusty nail. They were hospitalized and given tetanus shots. She posted a photo of them both on instagram and warned others "DONT STEP ON A RUSTY NAIL ..... Well we both did 😨😨".

As a Seattle foot doctor, I believe they were fortunate for three reasons.

Received tetanus shots right away
Although most of us are supposed to get a tetanus booster every 10 years, many of us don't. It's important to do so to prevent tetanus, a potentially deadly disease.

Had bare feet
Stepping on a nail when barefoot means they only had exposure to the nail. It turns out that stepping on anything sharp that goes straight into your foot when wearing shoes is much worse. Any bacteria, fungus, or funky material from the shoe that gets imbedded in your foot can create a nasty wound and infection.

Probably don't have diabetes
Also, if either of them had been diabetic, a wound from a rusty nail could have much more serious consequences as they often turn into ulcers that don't easily heal.

Of course the best thing to do is to avoid those rusty nails or sharp glass to begin with. If you find yourself in a similar predicament as Heidi or Zac, call us immediately at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+


By Dr. Rion Berg
August 25, 2015
Category: Bunions

As a woman you have a very busy life. You work full time, try your best to be a good mother to your kids, and make time to have fun with your husband. You desperately need feet that aren't throbbing from bunion pain.

Your biggest concern is figuring out a way to be in style for work without bunion pain.

Let's drop the style issue for a moment and focus on what I'm going to do to help you resolve the pain you're in. Because as long as you're in pain, style will always be secondary unless you're a total slave to fashion like Victoria Beckham.

As a Seattle podiatrist my goal in helping you with your bunions is two-fold:

  • Relief the pressure and pain caused by the irritation brought on by the bunions

  • Stop the progression of your bunions

Very often we'll be able to get you comfortable without surgery through:

  • Use of protective padding to remove the friction caused by your foot rubbing against your shoes.

  • Getting rid of corns and calluses

  • Evaluating your foot type to determine if orthotics will help offload the pain

  • And of course, choosing shoes that will keep your tootsies happy and won't exacerbate your condition.

Choose shoes that are supportive and fit properly, with a heel of one inch or lower, and a toe box that accommodates your bunion (no pointy shoes for you, sorry).

In the past several years shoe designers have gotten smart. They realize that a large number of women have foot problems. And that there's no way they'll squeeze into a shoe that may have started them down the path to bunions in the first place.

Some good places to start include:

  • Nordstrom, of course - Nordies has some of the best buyers and staff in the industry so check there first.

  • Barking Dog Shoes - this online store has been around since 2007 and was started by a woman who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and still wanted to wear cute shoes.
     
  • Calla Shoes - still want to dress like Victoria Beckham? Attention: I don't recommend heels to any of my bunion patients. However, if you're going to wear them anyway you might as well try one that says they're designed for women with bunions.

For more information about bunions read these article:

Bunions
Bunion Surgery
All Bunions Are Not Created Equal

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

  • Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

  • Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

  • Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

 


By Dr. Rion Berg
August 24, 2015
Tags: stretching   orthotics  

You're a runner. You love running Green Lake, through Discovery Park, and the Arboretum. It helps reduce your stress and keeps you strong.

What you can't stand is the way your feet and legs react to this otherwise very healthy sport. In particular you'd love to know how to prevent shin splints.

Unfortunately some runners are more prone to getting shin splints than others, particularly those people who have wonky foot mechanics or tight calf muscles. For more information read "Are You Getting Shin Splints Every Time You Run".

Here are some sure fire ways to prevent this condition from starting in the first place.

Build up to It
If you're new to running or you want to compete in a race, make sure you give yourself plenty of time to build up to it. We recommend no more than a 10% increase in your program per week.

Buy new shoes
Purchase new shoes every 500 miles and make sure they provide the necessary support by watching this video.

Use proper stretching techniques
A tight calf muscle is the biggest problem when it comes to runners getting shin splints. Even though wall stretches to lengthen tight calf muscles are most often recommended, these usually don't work for runners who have very tight calf muscles. At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City we recommend wearing Achilles splints for 30 minutes each day, dispensed by your podiatrist.

Prescriptive orthotics may be necessary
If you have shin splints due to faulty foot mechanics, your Seattle podiatrist will likely recommend an insert or prescriptive orthotics.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+


By Dr. Rion Berg
August 21, 2015
Category: sports injuries
Tags: orthotics   runners   stress fracture  

young woman runningRunning is a huge part of how you stay fit. You love participating in races with your friends. But lately you've been dogged by horrible pain in your shins every time you run.

Can this be shin splints?

Probably. The great majority of pain below the knee--which can affect the front and the side of your leg-- is shin splints.

What Causes Shin Splints in Runners?

  • Beginning or seasoned runners who increase their training too rapidly.

  • Imperfect foot structure - if you have flat feet or your foot excessively pronates when you run you're more likely to get shin splints.

  • Improper stretching

  • Poor footwear

Can I Treat Shin Splints At Home?

  • Once you've developed shin splints, you'll need to stop running so you can heal.

  • Use ice to bring down the inflammation

  • Ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatories can also help reduce the pain.

Do I Have to See A Doctor?
Yes. Shin splints can be tricky.

  • If you have shin splints due to your foot mechanics, your podiatrist will likely recommend an insert or prescriptive orthotics.

  • Shin splints may also be a sign of a stress fracture or other condition that needs to be addressed right away.

How Can I Prevent Shin Splints?

  • Build up your training gradually; increase the time you spend running and your distance by only 10% a week.
  • Instead of just doing the typical static calf stretches, incorporate dynamic warm-up exercises. These exercises will do two things:  warm the body’s muscles and soft tissues for optimum performance and reduce the risk of injury from overloading inadequately prepared muscles.

If you're a runner with shin splints, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

For more information about heel pain in runners download our eBook, "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runners".

In addition, our newsletter "Foot Sense" comes out monthly.  You can also check out our past issues. Every issue contains a mouth-watering recipe and can be printed out for easier reading!

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+