Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for tag: bunions

By Dr. Rion Berg
October 21, 2016
Category: Bunions

You're all about being proactive when it comes to buying products, particularly those that affect your health, like running shoes. After scouring the internet you've learned about the importance of bringing in your old pair to show your wear patterns, your usual running distance, where your foot strikes the ground, your foot type, and any injuries you may have sustained.

If you have plantar fasciitis or bunions, you may have also had orthotics made by your Seattle podiatrist. But there's one hack that can improve comfort even more.

The lacing hack!

Recently the Washington Post wrote an article on this topic focusing on how you can lace your shoes so that you can get better performance when you run and feel better too.

We found the website Katie Runs This to get the lowdown on the exact techniques you'll need for your foot type or foot problem.

Bunions and Wide Forefeet
Orthotics can help tremendously with correcting the biomechanics of your foot to offload your bunions but proper lacing can help even more. This specific lacing technique can widen your forefoot to accommodate the bunion. From the bottom of the eye row, lace up the sides of the shoe. You won't start cross-lacing until you reach your midfoot and then tying the top as usual.

High Instep
The runner with a high instep does the best in a neutral, cushioned shoe. In addition this lacing tip will help with your comfort and performance. This technique starts at the toe of the shoe with a cross-lacing pattern and then doesn't lace again until the top of the shoe. It provides the room you need at the middle of the foot and keeps the shoe from feeling too tight across the arch.

Narrow Feet
The runner with narrow feet in many ways has the opposite problem of the high arched runner. If you can't find a shoe that will fit snugly enough at the midfoot here is a lacing technique that adds a loop right where you need it. Crosslace the shoe starting at the toe and then create a loop that you will thread through it to make it more snug. Continue lacing as usual.

Black Toenail
If you have a tendency to get black toenails, you'll need to allow the material above your big toe to be pulled up and off of the nail when the outside lace is tugged and tied tightly. The special threading technique will accomplish this goal mentioned in Katie's website.

If you're experiencing pain when you run, you can try a new lacing technique but it's also important to see a podiatrist to ensure you get a full evaluation. Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "The Complete Guide to Stopping Heel Pain in Runner" mailed directly to your home.

More tips about running and your feet:
5 Tips to Keep Runner's Feet Healthy and Strong
6 Hacks To Prevent Running Moms From Foot Injuries
7 Ways Runners Can Safely Manage Type II Diabetes

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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Photo credit: Katie Runs This blog

 

By Dr. Rion Berg
June 20, 2016
Category: Heel pain

Summer is finally here and you're just bought yourself a new pair of flip flops and got a fabulous pedicure. Now you're totally set to have an awesome summer with your friends. Your first stop is the beach on Alki and then your all headed to the Seattle Great Wheel and for a long walk on the waterfront.

As a Seattle podiatrist, I'm here to let you know that while flip flops are great for the beach and pool, they pale in comparison to other types of sandals and shoes when it comes to keeping you upright. That's right--you're much more likely to twist and ankle, trip, and fall when you've got them on particularly when you wear them walking, dancing, or for other activities.

But that's not all!

They can also create a lot of other problems for your feet.

Heel pain - flip flops have absolutely no arch support. If you have flat feet, you're already prone to heel pain. Wearing flip flops will only make it more likely for you to develop this painful condition.

Bunions and hammertoes - the other problem with flip flops is that you have to constantly grip with your toes to keep them on your feet. That repeated gripping can cause painful tendinitis and lead to more rapid bunion and hammertoe formation. If your mother has either of these conditons, you're much more likely to get them -- swearing off flip flops except at the beach is a really good idea.

Stress fractures - walking, dancing, or exercising in flip flops can cause stress fractures or cracks in the bones of your feet.

Blisters - flip flops allow your foot to move around a lot and that can cause very painful blisters.

What Can Be Done?

  • Bring an extra pair of sandals or tennis shoes with you when you go out; that way you can switch out of your flip flops when activities ramp up.
  • Buy a pair of flip flops that have arch support like these Karina Vionic Sandals.
  • Look for a leather footbed when you shop; that will help prevent blisters.

If you're experiencing pain due to flip flop overuse, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
May 06, 2016
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: heel pain   bunions   Morton's Neuroma  

Mother's Day is here and you're looking forward to taking a break from all the things you do every day. Whether you're a mom running after young children or a mom whose kids are grown, and now your running after their kids. The truth is that you seldom have time to treat yourself.

Perhaps you've had some foot problems and you've simply haven't had the time to make it a priority. Well mom, now is the time to give yourself the gift of pain free feet.

Here are some of the most common foot pain problems we see in women:

Morton's Neuroma

Neuromas are more common in women who wearing high heels or are runners, although other women can also acquire it. Morton 's neuroma is a thickening of the nerves that leads to the third and fourth toes where you are most likely to feel the pain. Neuromas develop as a result tissue rubbing and irritating the nerves. If you feel like your walking on a pebble or have numbness, tingling or pain in that area of the foot you most likely have a neuroma.

Some fixes to try at home are icing the area and wearing shoes with no more than a 1 inch heel and don't squeeze your toes. If pain persists, orthotics can correct how you walk to lessen it.

Plantar Fasciitis

Women will often discover they have heel pain or plantar fasciitis with first steps out of bed in the morning. That's when this foot problem is most painful. As the fascia and calf muscles warm up and stretch the pain subsides. However, the problem is still there and needs to be treated. If you've just figured out you have this problem than trying an over the counter insert like Powerstep can be a good starting point. If pain persists you'll need to see a Seattle podiatrist that can offer a more comprehensive plan to help you get out of pain.

Bunions

Bunions are also more common in women. Along with inheriting a foot type that can set you up for bunions, high heel wear can also be the culprit in bunion development and progression. If you've just started noticing that the bump on the side of your foot is getting larger, the most important thing to do is to limit your high heel wear. But don't stop there. Come in for an evaluation with Dr. Berg to make sure you're doing everything you can to stop the progression and reduce the pain.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

Now that we're full swing into primary season, I can't help but wonder how the candidate's feet are faring, given the increased hours they've had to spend on them. Since I don't have any insider information, I can only hazard a guess at what might be going on for these folks.

Here are some causes of painful feet and who is most likely to face them.

Wearing High Heels

At last count Hilary Clinton and Carly Fiorini were the only female candidates. Although I haven't checked out Hilary or Carly's heels to see how they measure up, I hope by now they would know better than to wear high, high heels on the campaign trail. Of course Carly is not a front runner so I would be much more concerned about Hilary's feet since she's been stumping a lot more lately.

High heels tend to cause more problems in women who already have certain foot conditions such as bunions and neuromas. But they also could be problematic if Hilary decided to ditch her high heels for a pair of tennis shoes. Extended wear of high heels can cause the calf muscle to shorten. Suddenly switching to flat, flat shoes can cause the calf muscle to stretch quickly and cause plantar fasciitis. It's best to keep heels at 1 inch to prevent problems.

Being Overweight

Although most of the candidates appear to fall within the normal range for weight, Governor Chris Christy does not. Unfortunately for Governor Christy every extra pound of weight puts more force on his feet making it much more likely that he suffers from one of the following foot problems: heel pain, bunions, or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Of course being overweight also puts people at higher risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and stroke.

Getting Older

As we age so does the likelihood that we'll develop a problem with our feet. Common problems seen in older patients are arthritis, fungal nails, loss of fat pads on the bottom of our feet, and balance issues. The oldest candidate front runners are Bernie Sanders - 75, Donald Trump - 70, Hilary Clinton - 69, and Jeb Bush - 63. They are all more likely than their younger counterparts to need a break from stumping, some padding in their shoes, and a handrail to prevent them from tripping while going up to the podium to speak. Candidates that keep themselves healthy and fit are less likely to suffer from some of the problems that affect an aging body, such as balance.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

By Dr. Rion Berg
September 10, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: heel pain   bunions   neuromas  

As teachers Lavina Smith and John Stafford take a break from the picket line at Roosevelt High to pose for a shot, I got to thinking about how much your feet will tolerate before they go on strike.

Just like striking Seattle teachers who been asked to work longer hours for a minimal raise in pay (after 6 years of no cost of living increase), your feet will only be willing to take so much before screaming "I can't stand it anymore".

Here are signs that your feet are on strike.

Heel pain
You've been walking around with a lot of heel pain, but recently it's reached the breaking point. Waking up with the sensation that someone drove a nail into your heels when you got out of bed this morning is a sure sign your feet are no longer working for you--and have gone on strike.

Swollen feet and ankles
You've been ignoring this problem for awhile now, figuring it will just go away on its own. Your dogs get swollen with walking and standing, but now they're swollen all the time.

OK--now you're a bit concerned.And you should be!

Some swelling with walking and standing as we get into our 50s and beyond may not be a cause for concern. But constant swelling could signal an infection, an injury, venous insufficiency (problems with the blood returning to the heart), or a deep blood clot or deep vein thrombosis.

Walking is a constant problem
You may have started out with some small pain that went away once you got off your feet. But now walking is really a problem. Joining an actual picket line would put your feet in a heap of trouble. Lots of foot and ankle problems can cause foot pain. Besides heel pain or plantar fasciitis, you could be suffering from worsening bunions, neuromas, or an ingrown toenail.

Whatever their reason for striking, your feet deserve to take time off so that they can be seen by a Seattle podiatrist.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+