Dr. Berg's Foot Facts

Posts for category: foot conditions

By Dr. Rion Berg
February 23, 2016
Category: foot conditions

You're ready for a night out on the town. As you put on your favorite heels you remember that the bump on the back of your heel keeps getting larger and more painful. You settle for a pair of flat shoes that won't aggravate it.

What is that weird bump? Known as Haglund's deformity this often painful and strange protrusion is caused by wearing rigid pump-style shoes, as its common name "pump bump" implies.

Causes

While any rigid style shoes can bring on and aggravate the bump, certain foot types will make it more likely for Haglund's deformity to develop.

Symptoms

In addition to the bump other symptoms are:

  • swelling in the heel

  • redness or tenderness near the inflamed area

  • moderate to severe pain

Left untreated Haglund's deformity can lead to bursitis ( a fluid-filled sac between the tendon and the bone).

Diagnosis and Treatment

At the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City Dr. Berg will examine your feet and very likely take an X-ray to ensure a proper diagnosis and to review the structure of the heel bone.

Conservative treatment of this condition is focused on getting you out of pain by relieving pressure on the heel bone and reducing the inflammation. The potential treatments most often used are:

  • Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications

  • Ice

  • Shoes that won't further irritate the heel bone such backless shoes or soft backed shoes

  • Heel lifts or heel pads

  • Prescriptive orthotics

  • Ultrasound

These solutions can be a tremendous help in treating this condition, however if none of this options work, surgery can be done that removes excess bone from the heel. Once the source of the pressure is removed the soft tissue surrounding the bone will return to normal.

If your bony protrusion is causing problems, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
December 30, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: foot pain   orthotics  

Snow in the Cascades--finally! You've been chomping at the bit to get out there and ski your heart out. The last thing you want to worry about is foot pain. However, the last time you went skiing your feet were killing you. You want to get out there but you don't want to ruin a perfect ski day with painful feet.  

So what could be the problem?

Your feet have gotten larger

Many adults experience an increase in shoe size due mostly to weight gain. If you wearing boots that are too tight you're going to experience a lot of foot pain and possibly lose a nail. Of course the solution is to purchase a new pair of boots.

Your ski boots are the problem

Ski boots are often the culprit when it comes to foot pain while skiing. It's very important to choose a store like REI or a ski shop you trust that knows how to properly fit ski boots. While they'll have specific techniques for fitting your boots, it's also your responsibility to prepare for the boot fitting. REI suggests you wear thin, synthetic ski socks and try on the boots in the afternoon or evening since feet tend to swell during the latter part of the day.

Your foot mechanics are off

You may already experience foot pain when you walk around in regular shoes, or perhaps it's just when you're skiing. If it's the latter, keep in mind you're exerting a lot more pressure on your feet and ankles when you ski making some foot problems more likely to show up then. e.g. Pain in the ball of your foot.  Either way if you're feet are still giving you trouble after buying a properly fitted boot, make your way down to my office. I'll assess your feet to determine whether you need additional support, such as custom orthotics.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "No More Foot Pain", mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
October 30, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: psoriasis  

Today the internet reminded me that it's World Psoriasis Day and so as a Seattle podiatrist I wanted to let people know that while this condition is most often found on the scalp, knees, elbows and torso it's also found on the feet.

Causes and Appearance

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that appears as raised, red, scaly patches on the skin that cause itching, burning, and stinging. When it shows up on the feet it's sometime hard to distinguish from other foot conditions such as Athlete's foot. On the toenails it can have a pitted appearance and can be confused with fungal toenails. Psoriasis can also be found on the soles of the feet.

Triggers

Psoriasis triggers vary by person. Some people are primarily triggered by stress while others are triggered by things external to the body such as injury, vaccinations, and sunburn. Allergies, diet, and weather have also been thought to trigger psoriasis but more research is needed.

Treatment

  • Stress reduction - in the case of psoriasis the body over responds to stress causing the system to increase inflammation and increase the pain and itch. Decreasing stress through meditation and exercise are most often recommended to alleviate these symptoms.

  • Keep skin hydrated - creams and oils that can lock in moisture such as Amerigel or coconut oil will help prevent and ameliorate symptoms. Other ideas can be found in this Psoriasis Skin-Care Product Guide.

  • Remove scales - it's important to reduce excess skin and prevent psoriasis plaques from cracking and flaking through scale removal. Over-the-counter lotions that contain salicylic acid, lactic acid, urea or phenol will help (National Psoriasis Foundation).

  • Medication - there are also prescription drugs that will help reduce the itch.

If you have a skin condition on your feet or some other foot problem, call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

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By Dr. Rion Berg
October 16, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: diabetes   MRSA  

As we watch the news and learn about the career ending MRSA infection acquired by Daniel Fells of the NY Giants, it's scary to consider that your kid may be vulnerable to this potentially life threatening bacteria. As a podiatrist who has treated many wounds and saved limbs, I wanted to let you know about the things you can do to keep your young athlete safe.

First, what is MRSA?

MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant staph aureus. Methicillin was the antibiotic used to treat staph aureus in the past but now this new form is resistant to it making it much more difficult to treat and more dangerous to the person who gets it. MRSA is highly contagious and can be easily transmitted through body contact which is one of the reasons athletes in high contact sports such as football, basketball, and soccer need to be educated about it.

Fortunately there are specific symptoms for young athletes and their parents to watch for and specific things that can be done to prevent it.

Symptoms of MRSA

The symptoms of MRSA include:

  • Swollen, painful, red bumps

  • Heat or warmth

  • Pus or drainage from a wound

  • More advanced signs are fever, chills, body aches, rash, or shortness of breath and can mean the infection has entered the bloodstream (be aware that some of these symptoms mimic the flu)

Prevention of MRSA in Young Athletes

  • Good hand hygiene is extremely important. Kids should wash their hands before and after workouts and practice.

  • Scrapes, cuts, and injuries should be washed thoroughly and bandaged.

  • Kids should not share soap, towels, or razors.

  • Athletes need to shower immediately after practice.

  • Athletic equipment should be wiped down before and after use

If someone you know shows these signs and symptoms, contact your primary care physician immediately or call 911 if symptoms have advanced.

Does a loved one have diabetes and an ulcer that is not going away? Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

By Dr. Rion Berg
September 10, 2015
Category: foot conditions
Tags: heel pain   bunions   neuromas  

As teachers Lavina Smith and John Stafford take a break from the picket line at Roosevelt High to pose for a shot, I got to thinking about how much your feet will tolerate before they go on strike.

Just like striking Seattle teachers who been asked to work longer hours for a minimal raise in pay (after 6 years of no cost of living increase), your feet will only be willing to take so much before screaming "I can't stand it anymore".

Here are signs that your feet are on strike.

Heel pain
You've been walking around with a lot of heel pain, but recently it's reached the breaking point. Waking up with the sensation that someone drove a nail into your heels when you got out of bed this morning is a sure sign your feet are no longer working for you--and have gone on strike.

Swollen feet and ankles
You've been ignoring this problem for awhile now, figuring it will just go away on its own. Your dogs get swollen with walking and standing, but now they're swollen all the time.

OK--now you're a bit concerned.And you should be!

Some swelling with walking and standing as we get into our 50s and beyond may not be a cause for concern. But constant swelling could signal an infection, an injury, venous insufficiency (problems with the blood returning to the heart), or a deep blood clot or deep vein thrombosis.

Walking is a constant problem
You may have started out with some small pain that went away once you got off your feet. But now walking is really a problem. Joining an actual picket line would put your feet in a heap of trouble. Lots of foot and ankle problems can cause foot pain. Besides heel pain or plantar fasciitis, you could be suffering from worsening bunions, neuromas, or an ingrown toenail.

Whatever their reason for striking, your feet deserve to take time off so that they can be seen by a Seattle podiatrist.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day. You can also request an appointment online.

Get our free foot book "Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life" , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Follow Dr. Berg on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+